Hall and Hall Wins Auction Marketing Campaign of the Year

May 19th, 2014
Hall and Hall Auctions

Hall and Hall Auctions

Winners of the 2014 National Auctioneers Association/USA TODAY Marketing Competition have been announced, with “The Auction Marketing Campaign of the Year” being awarded to Hall and Hall Auctions for the Hager Farm & Ranches Absolute Auction campaign, which helped lead to a $46+ million total sale and land price records being established in two counties.

Hall and Hall Auctions also won first place in the Company Promotional Video category, thanks to Aerial Imaging Productions, and second place in the Multi-Property Real Estate Auction category for O’Dell Auctions.

The task of determining winners was given to a panel of marketing and advertising professionals, all of which have backgrounds in branding, promotion, public relations and graphic design. Judging criteria included considerations such as creativity, effectiveness, clarity and visual appeal.

Kansas Farm and Ranch Land Auction Totals $10.74+ Million

March 18th, 2014

On March 3rd Hall and Hall Auctions had approximately 125 people in attendance at its Kansas farm and ranch auction in Colby, KS, with 52 registered bidders. The auction totaled $10,764,300 on 7,600 acres of Northwest Kansas properties. There were 800+ irrigated acres, seven pivots, 3,330+ dryland farm acres, and over 3,000 acres of pasture offered in 12 tracts.

“The was a very good example of Hall and Hall’s marketing program and the technology we bring to auction day for a successful event,” said Scott Shuman of Hall and Hall Auctions.”

hall and hall auction

Architect of a Legacy Ranch

March 5th, 2014

Ranch photography

Field Sport Concepts’ expertise is in the development and implementation of plans which conserve open lands through environmentally sound recreational use. We believe that land which sustains itself by producing income as open space today is land most likely to remain open space for generations to come. This post is the second in a series from Field Sport Concepts Affiliate Sonja Howle of Famous Barns.

As you explore the architecture of San Antonio and Texas, one name comes up again and again. Alfred Giles. Giles was born in Hillingdon, Middlesex, England in 1853 and after years of architectural study in London, he moved to San Antonio in 1873. Many of the state’s most remarkable county court houses were designed by Giles; his work is showcased at Fort Sam Houston’s Military Base, in Officers’ Quarters, Barracks and the famous Quadrangle. He built mansions, carriage houses and commercial structures throughout Texas and Mexico, since he also had an office in Monterrey.

In 1885 he purchased a 13,000 acre ranch in Kendall County with his brother-in-law and partner Judge John Herndon James. They bred registered Aberdeen-Angus cattle and angora goats. They called the place Hillingdon Ranch.

Remarkably, 129 years and six generations later, the ranch is still owned by the Giles descendants and remains a working ranch.

David Langford, Alfred’s great-grandson,

lives there and is well-respected as a wildlife, western life and landscape photographer. He has not only won awards for his photographs in the Images for Conservation Fund competitions but he’s hosted photographers at Hillingdon Ranch as well. His career in photography is as significant as his lifetime commitment to conservation.

David and his family learned stewardship first-hand. They understand elements like the water cycle, soil regeneration, plant succession and the vital role of open spaces in everything from flood control to carbon sequestration.

His public service has involved over two decades as an Executive Vice President of the Texas Wildlife Association. (He is currently vice president emeritus). His efforts and those of that group ensured access to an invaluable tool to help rural landowners: the “wildlife management property tax valuation.” This allowed the land owner options with their resources: hunting, birding, wildlife and nature tourism, and it created a new level of stewardship.

David is in the middle of a book-signing tour for “Hillingdon Ranch, Four Seasons, Six Generations.” His new book illustrates the diversity and depth of his family’s Kendall County Ranch. And for my friends in the San Antonio area, David will be at the Patrick Heath Public Library in Boerne for a book signing during the Local Author Bookfest on March 1, 2014. I’ll stop by and say Hi – may see you there.

For more, contact Sonja Howle at Famous Barns and Robert McKee at Field Sport Concepts

Knipe to Speak at National Convention

February 7th, 2014

(Idaho) John Knipe, President of Knipe Land Company, has been selected to speak at the upcoming Annual Cattleman’s Convention.

This year’s National Cattle and Beef Council Annual Meetings and Convention will be February 3-5 in Nashville, Tennessee.

Knipe will speak at 1:00 pm on February 5, 2014. This is the beef cattle industry’s largest event with close to 10,000 ranchers, farmers,

and landowners are expected to attend this year’s National Cattle and Beef Council Annual Meetings.

Read the rest of this entry »

Open Fences Shows & Events

February 7th, 2014

Our “Kick off to Dallas Safari Club” party was well attended. The Beretta Gallery in Highland Park is a wonderful place to hold a get together. 162 people attended and it went off without a hitch. The door prizes consisted on a Yamaha Grizzly 550, a trip for two to Laurentian Wildlife Estate in Canada, a selection of clothing from Beretta, a swag bag from the Yellowstone Club and a custom knife set from Lone Star Ag Credit. Thanks to all who attended and Covey Rise Magazine for all the help. I look forward to next year, same place same time!

Off to Vegas for SCI Feb 5th – 8th Booth 502 main floor!

Beretta Gallery Dallas party.

The Dallas Safari Club was a great success. We meet many readers and advertisers alike. Looking forward to SCI in Vegas on the 5th – 8th. Come see us on the main floor booth 502. The booth will be full on Custom Covers from the winter issue.

Farm and Ranch Values Increasing

November 18th, 2013

Farm and Ranch Values Increasing

by John Knipe

(BOISE, IDAHO) The Department of Interior’s United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) completed its report entitled “Land Values 2013 Summary”. The report was created and just released through the USDA’s – National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report looked at farm real estate values, cropland values, and pastureland values in comparison from 2012 to 2013.

Farm real estate values, according to this USDA report, increased in Idaho (+3.8%), Oregon (+2.4%), California (+1.4%), Washington (+2.2%), and Montana (+3.9%) from 2012 to 2013. The report also demonstrates that the average farm real estate value across the entire United States averaged $2,900 per acre. The report defines “farm real estate values” as a measurement of value of all land and buildings on a farm. The national farm real estate value average demonstrates an increase in value of 9.4 percent over values of farm real estate in 2012. Values of farm real estate vary location to location, region to region and area to area but the report demonstrates average values for the United States. States in the Southwestern United States shows no change in value. States in the Northern Plains, on the other hand, she an increase in value equal to over 23 percent over values in 2012, according the report. The lowest values for farm real estate were in the Mountain States, with an average per price acre of just over $1,000 an acre. Corn Belt States had the highest values in farm real estate values. The average price per acre of farm real estate in these states averaged $6,400 per acre, the study and report found.

Cropland values increased in Idaho (+5.5%), Oregon (+4.4%), California (+3.9%), Washington (+12.1%), and Montana (+4.2%). Cropland values, on average across the United States, showed a stronger gain in value. Cropland values increased 13 percent from 2012 to 2013, which is an increase of $460 per acre, rising to an national average of $4,000 per acre. Southeast States saw a decrease in 2013 cropland values, with a loss in value of 2.8 percent. In contrast, the Corn Belt States saw increase in cropland values of over 16 percent in 2012 and another increase of 25 percent in 2013.

Pasture values increased in Oregon (+9.7%), Washington (+1.2%), and Montana (+1.8%). Values in Idaho and California showed no change in value. Pasture values in the United States increased by 4.3 percent from 2012 to 2013 to a national average of $1,200 per acre. Pasture values decreased from 2012 to 2013 in the Southeastern States with a loss of 1.5 percent. Northern Plain States showed the strongest gain. Pasture values in these states increased over 18 percent in 2013.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Knipe Land Company traces its roots back to 1944, when it first opened its doors in Nampa Idaho making the company one of the oldest run real estate companies in Idaho and the Western United States. John Knipe is a Past President of the Idaho Realtors Land Institute, Past Regional Vice President of the National Association of Realtors – Realtors Land Institute, serves as President of the World Organization Land Federation and Executive Vice President of the American Land Institute. Knipe has won over a dozen advanced marketing awards from the National Association of Realtors and his company was selected awarded one of the Best Brokerages in the United States by the Land Report Magazine. Knipe has written courses and books on farm, ranch and land brokerage and land development and is a Senior Real Estate Instructor with the World Organization Land Federation. For assistance in purchase or selling a farm, ranch or highly appreciated real estate asset, cont Knipe at (208) 345-3163 or [email protected] Visit his company on the world wide web at www.knipeland.com At the end of August 2013 when these studies were created, based on closed sales volume when ranked against all the other Realtors in the Intermountain MLS, Knipe ranked 25th in highest closed sales volume. In 2012, Knipe ranked 16th for closed sales volume when ranked against all other Realtors throughout the Intermountain MLS.

For a tailored marketing program on your farm or ranch specific to your needs, or if you are looking to buy a farm or ranch, you are encouraged to contact a “Board Certified” Land Broker. Reach John Knipe, “Board Certified” Land Broker at [email protected] or (208) 345-3163.

Kansas Farm and Ranch Land Sells for $46 Million+ at Auction

November 12th, 2013

November 12, 2013 By Steve
The Triple Crown of auctions took place last week when 33,667 acres of Kansas farm and ranch land were put on the market by Hall and Hall Auctions. More than 500 spectators, including 128 registered bidders, participated in a two-day auction, which totaled $46,485,770 in land sales. Highlights of the auctions included: a 160-acre Wichita County tract that fetched $3,312 per acre and ranchland south of Meade, Kansas that brought $1,007 per acre. Properties were purchased by 22 separate individuals, including local landowners and buyers from Louisiana, Texas, Nebraska and Colorado. For more information contact John Wildin at 620-662-0411 or Scott Shuman at 970-716-2120.

Kansas famr for sale

Farm and Ranch Values and Sales by John Knipe, Board Certified Land Broker

October 22nd, 2013

(BOISE, IDAHO) The Department of Interior’s United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) completed its report entitled “Land Values 2013 Summary”. The report was created and released a few weeks ago through the USDA’s – National Agricultural Statistics Service. According to John Knipe, Farm and Ranch Broker and President of Knipe Land Company, “The report looked at farm real estate values, cropland values, and pastureland values in comparison from 2012 to 2013.”

Farm real estate values, according to this USDA report, increased in Idaho (+3.8%), Oregon (+2.4%), California (+1.4%), Washington (+2.2%), and Montana (+3.9%) from 2012 to 2013. The report also demonstrates that the average farm real estate value across the entire United States averaged $2,900 per acre. The report defines “farm real estate values” as a measurement of value of all land and buildings on a farm. The national farm real estate value average demonstrates an increase in value of 9.4 percent over values of farm real estate in 2012. Values of farm real estate vary location to location, region to region and area to area but the report demonstrates average values for the United States. States in the Southwestern United States shows no change in value. States in the Northern Plains, on the other hand, she an increase in value equal to over 23 percent over values in 2012, according the report. The lowest values for farm real estate were in the Mountain States, with an average per price acre of just over $1,000 an acre. Corn Belt States had the highest values in farm real estate values. The average price per acre of farm real estate in these states averaged $6,400 per acre, the study and report found.

Cropland values increased in Idaho (+5.5%), Oregon (+4.4%), California (+3.9%), Washington (+12.1%), and Montana (+4.2%). Cropland values, on average across the United States, showed a stronger gain in value. Cropland values increased 13 percent from 2012 to 2013, which is an increase of $460 per acre, rising to an national average of $4,000 per acre. Southeast States saw a decrease in 2013 cropland values, with a loss in value of 2.8 percent. In contrast, the Corn Belt States saw increase in cropland values of over 16 percent in 2012 and another increase of 25 percent in 2013.

Pasture values increased in Oregon (+9.7%), Washington (+1.2%), and Montana (+1.8%). Values in Idaho and California showed no change in value. Pasture values in the United States increased by 4.3 percent from 2012 to 2013 to a national average of $1,200 per acre. Pasture values decreased from 2012 to 2013 in the Southeastern States with a loss of 1.5 percent. Northern Plain States showed the strongest gain. Pasture values in these states increased over 18 percent in 2013, according to the USDA report.

Knipe Land Company also completed a Mid-year farm, ranch and land market analysis in the Pacific Northwest. Specific counties in Idaho, Oregon and Washington were considered for this report. The company looked at over 2,000 farms and ranches and land parcels being marketed that are 40 acres and larger, actively on the market between January 1, 2013 through August 31, 2013. 338 farms and ranches were sold and closed. 2,266 Farms and ranches were listed during this time and offered for sale in these three States. “15 Percent of the farms and ranches on the market have sold and closed, so far this year”, according to John Knipe, President of Knipe Land Company. “Of the three states included in the Pacific Northwest study, Idaho has had the strongest percentage of closed farm and ranch and land sales so far this year”, Knipe said. “Idaho is seeing about 1 closed sale for every 5 farms and ranches listed in the first 9 months of the year”. At the time the study was done, Knipe ranked #25 based on closed sales volume when ranked against all other Realtors in the Intermountain MLS. The Intermountain MLS has just under 4,000 Realtors and includes many Realtors in Central Idaho, Southwestern Idaho and Eastern Oregon. “Most farm and ranch sales seem to happen closer to the end of the year, between production periods, so we are hopeful of seeing the year ending with even stronger numbers across Idaho, Oregon and Washington,” Knipe said. Knipe Land Company and Knipe Land North, LLC, market, sell and professional manage farms, ranches, timber and land in Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and Montana.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Knipe Land Company traces its roots back to 1944, when it first opened its doors in Nampa Idaho making the company one of the oldest run real estate companies in Idaho and the Western United States. John Knipe is a Past President of the Idaho Realtors Land Institute, Past Regional Vice President of the National Association of Realtors – Realtors Land Institute, serves as President of the World Organization Land Federation and Executive Vice President of the American Land Institute. Knipe has won over a dozen advanced marketing awards from the National Association of Realtors and his company was selected awarded one of the Best Brokerages in the United States by the Land Report Magazine. Knipe has written courses and books on farm, ranch and land brokerage and land development and is a Senior Real Estate Instructor with the World Organization Land Federation. For assistance in purchase or selling a farm, ranch or highly appreciated real estate asset, contact Knipe at (208) 345-3163 or [email protected] Visit his company on the world wide web at www.knipeland.com At the end of August 2013 when these studies were created, based on closed sales volume when ranked against all the other Realtors in the Intermountain MLS, Knipe ranked 25th in highest closed sales volume. In 2012, Knipe ranked 16th for closed sales volume when ranked against all other Realtors in the Intermountain MLS for that year.

Ranches for Sale in Utah: The Iconic Trees Ranch Adjoining Zion National Park Sold by Mirr Ranch Group

August 21st, 2013

Summary: The 2,066 acre Trees Ranch adjoining Zion National Park in southern Utah was sold this month by Mirr Ranch Group of Denver, Colo. Listed for $25 million, the conservation property sold to a private party, and the sellers are the heirs of Jim Trees and Lionel Pincus.

DENVER, COLO. [August 21, 2013] – Trees Ranch, a 2,066-acre ecologically-rich property surrounded by Zion National Park and the Canaan Wilderness Area in Springdale, Utah, was recently sold by Mirr Ranch Group of Denver, Colo. Listed for $25 million, the conservation property sold to a private party. The sellers are the heirs of Jim Trees, founder, former chairman and CEO of Fischer, Francis, Trees and Watts, Inc., and the heirs of Lionel Pincus, founder of Warburg Pincus, LLC.

“We are pleased to have found a buyer who will be a good steward of the land, a legacy started by Jim Trees and Lionel Pincus many years ago. They saw the ranch as an opportunity to have a national park of their own, and it looks like that legacy will continue,” said listing broker, Ken Mirr.

The Trees Ranch transaction comes on the heels of other Mirr Ranch Group sales adjoining National Parks, such as the Mantle Ranch, an inholding in Dinosaur National Monument. Furthermore, the Sandy Ranch, a cattle ranch adjoining Capitol Reef National Park with large grazing allotments on the adjoining Dixie National Forest and BLM lands, is currently on the market.

“This sale adds to Mirr Ranch Group’s proven track record of marketing and selling ranches and conservation properties in the West including those adjoining National Parks, National Forests and other public lands. We are the leading brokerage for these types of unique properties,” added Mirr.

The distinctiveness of Trees Ranch is reflected by its scenic landscapes, rare flora and fauna, valuable water rights, a 60-acre lake, miles of riparian corridors and river, irrigated fields and orchards, and inimitable architecture. In addition to access and adjacency to the park and wilderness, the ranch’s significant conservation values include Utah’s first “Wild and Scenic” designation on the adjoining Virgin River and Shunes Creek, its adjacency to a “Natural Research Area” in Parunuweap Canyon, and significant historical and cultural sites like the Shunesburg settlement and traces of the Virgin Anasazi and Paiute Indians.

“The Trees Ranch is one of the most unique ranch properties in the Southwestern United States. The ranch’s proximity to Zion National Park makes it the ultimate conservation and recreation property – a true one of a kind,” explains Jason Corzine of The Trust for Public Land.

For media inquiries, arrange for an interview, or get an expert quote, please contact Mallory Boyce at (303) 623-4545 ext. 4. Photography available upon request.

About Mirr Ranch Group
Mirr Ranch Group offers marketing and buyer acquisition services for fine sporting properties and legacy ranches for sale throughout the American West. Brokers for the company are known for their expertise in sporting, public lands and conservation in addition to their unsurpassed knowledge of ranch transactions.

For more information, contact:
Mirr Ranch Group
915 South Pearl Street
Denver, CO 80209
(303) 623-4545
http://www.MirrRanchGroup.com

Search for the finest Utah Ranches for Sale on Landbrokermls.com

Water and the American Landowner Part 3 of 3

August 13th, 2013

Examples of Forward Thinking in Water and Land Conservation
Part 3 of 3 – By Tom Roberts

The following article is the third in a three part series where Open Fences is highlighting innovative land and water conservation practices by landowners throughout the United States. In the first article, we introduced a rice farmer in Texas who has conserved 40% of his water usage and increased yields with a technique called precision grading on his fields. In the second article, we introduced Beartooth Capital, an investment group out of Montana that acquires degraded ranch properties and conducts ecological enhancements to increase the value of the investments.

For this third article, we are going to introduce a land management and business tool called environmental banking as a way for property owners to generate substantial income from their land while simultaneously improving the health of the environment.

Ranches for Sale

Environmental banking can basically be described as the creation of a natural resource commodity that is then sold to a customer, usually a developer or polluter who is required to pay compensation for the impacts associated with their activities.

For example, if a developer had plans to build houses or roads on a parcel of land that included wetlands and these wetlands were impacted from the construction activities, then by regulations set forth by the US Environmental Protection Agency through the Clean Water Act, the developer would be required to compensate for these wetland losses. The US Army Corps of Engineers would have jurisdiction of the process and would be the agency responsible to ensure the compensatory actions were met.

To further the example, say this developer impacted one acre of wetlands, then they would be required to mitigate for at least one acre of newly built wetlands, but oftentimes the Army Corps of Engineers will set the ratio at 2 acres to 1 or even 3 to 1. This process can become very expensive as they will have to pay for the design, construction, monitoring and maintenance of the mitigation wetlands. Plus, they are not off the hook until the Army Corps of Engineers certifies them as successful wetlands five years after construction is completed. This can be a long and expensive process, especially if their mitigation efforts are unsuccessful because they will have to start over.

However, there is another better option for this developer, which would be to purchase credits from an existing wetland mitigation bank instead of going through the process of doing it themselves. This article isn’t to show how developers and polluters can get out of having to mitigate their actions, but rather to show how ranch owners can provide an environmental benefit and take advantage of a growing market.

A wetland mitigation bank is where a landowner has built wetlands on their property for the purpose of selling the credits to people like this developer. The owners of the bank must go through a process to have the wetlands certified to ensure they function as a healthy ecosystem, but once they do, they are able to sell these credits on the market to customers within their area, usually based on the watershed where the wetlands are located. This is almost always substantially more cost effective for the developer and provides a much healthier and functional result on the ecosystem scale.

This isn’t just a better option for the developer because on the other side of the deal is that landowner who understood that they could create a commodity that could be sold in a real market that is producing substantial revenue streams. Some estimates have shown that the average cost to construct a wetland mitigation bank could be in the range of $10,000 to $30,000 per acre and would include the design, planning, and construction costs. However, these estimates also show that the average cost of the sale of the credits can range between $60,000 to $100,000 per acre depending on the supply and demand forces as well as the intensity of development within a certain area.

Some of the resources required for the wetland bank would, obviously, be to have land, appropriate soils, a good water source and the rights to use this water in this manner. If the resources were available, then it could make a lot of sense to explore the option of creating an environmental bank as another source for potentially substantial income and to create a real and lasting benefit for the environment. For ranchers and farmers who already have the natural resources available, but not the financial resources, they could explore the option of having an investor provide the capital costs to get the project going and share in profits from the sales.

Although the example that we discussed highlighted a wetland mitigation bank, there are many other types of environmental banking opportunities that a landowner could potentially initiate. These banks are becoming a major tool for the entrepreneurial land owner and investor. As with any business decision and investment, they will want to explore the potential of the commodity market they would be entering and identify the opportunities and constraints on their land.

Some of the other environmental banks that have been initiated are as follows:
• Wetland mitigation banks
• Carbon banks
• Energy banks
• Endangered species habitat banks
• Land development banks
• Water and water quality banks
To learn more about environmental banking and to see if developing a bank would make sense on your ranch property, please contact Tom Roberts, president of Western Lands – Ranch Restoration Services at 720-936-9973 and also visit their website at www.western-lands.com
Western Lands – Ranch Restoration Services is a company with offices in Parker, Colorado and Bozeman, MT. We provide design, project management, and owner’s rep services for the owners of legacy ranch properties throughout the United States.

Search for ranches for sale that would be feasible wetland resource banks.