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Boone Pickens' Mesa Vista Ranch: Over 100 Square Miles of Prime Eastern Texas Panhandle Ranch with Outstanding Improvements
#TX230169
Roberts, 
64,809.00 acres
With the recent passing of Boone Pickens, the listing price of the Mesa Vista Ranch has been reduced from the original price of $250,000,000 to $220,000,000. LOCATION: The Mesa Vista Ranch is located in Roberts County in the Eastern Texas Panhandle. The ranch is located about 30 miles north of Pampa, Texas, and approximately 85 miles northeast of Amarillo. ACRES: 64,809 +/- Acres HISTORY: In 1971, Boone purchased approximately 2,900 acres along the south side of the Canadian River in Roberts County, Texas. Over the years, Boone began to assemble additional adjoining land positioned along the Canadian River corridor, and today the Mesa Vista Ranch comprises over 100 square miles of prime Eastern Texas Panhandle ranch land. As Boone's assemblage continued, he spent millions and millions of dollars to make Mesa Vista one of the best improved ranches in the United States. He used cutting edge conservation practices to enhance the wildlife on the property. Today Boone proudly boasts that the Mesa Vista Ranch is, "the world's best quail hunting." PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: As Boone expanded his holdings, his focus always remained centered along the Canadian River. Today, the Mesa Vista Ranch stretches approximately 25 miles along the south side of the Canadian River. This lush river bottom land creates the centerpiece for the property, but the ranch features an unmatched variety of land types ranging from rolling sand hills to elevated ridges, mesa points and gently rolling, open prairie lands. The river bottom and numerous major drainages support abundant massive cottonwood trees, as well as willows, hackberry trees and others. Much of the river bottom is sub-irrigated and suitable for native hay production. Live spring water is found throughout several of the major drainages. In an effort to enhance wildlife on the property, over the years, Boone has been a leader in conservation practices that are now followed by many other sportsmen in the country. As a testament to Boone's conservation efforts, in 2008 he was named the recipient of the prestigious Park Cities Quail Unlimited Lifetime Sportsman Award. Boone maintains a small cow herd on the ranch, 400-500 cows Boone has placed over 1,000 quail feeders and numerous deer feeders on the ranch. He has created a number of food plot areas and added a network of buried waterlines with small water outlets to create wet areas for quail. LODGE COMPOUND: The Lodge, along with multiple support structures is located in a manicured, tree covered "park-like" setting. It is common to view whitetail deer and turkey in the mornings and afternoons, with turkey roosting in the trees in the late evening. This Lodge Compound has been the major gathering area for Boone's family and guests over the years. It has served an important role as a place where corporate heads have met to discuss and craft multi-million-dollar business transactions, politicians and large donors have gathered for political events. Few if any facilities can match the beauty of the Lodge Compound. Initial construction on the Lodge began in 1988, with numerous updates and additions added over the years. Presently, the Lodge itself comprises in excess of 25,000 square feet with an additional approximately 10,000 square feet of porches and patio areas. Surrounding the Lodge is significant landscaping, in-ground sprinkler systems, and underground electrical service. Adding to the ambiance of the Lodge are numerous bronze sculptures tastefully positioned on the grounds. In addition to the Lodge and support structures, the compound features a lighted tennis court, a skeet/trap range, and a small golf course with two fairways and greens and nine tee boxes. The Family House, which was completed in 2009, is located west of the Main Lodge. This house is a two-story with a third floor lounging and viewing room. The Family House contains over 6,000 square feet of living area and approximately 2,500 square feet of porches and patios. The Pub is located north of the Family House and is a two-story structure containing approximately 2,250 square feet of air-conditioned area. The Gun Room is a freestanding, single-story structure containing over 400 square feet. This building was constructed in 2005 and features a lounge area, bathroom, and kitchenette. The Gate House, adjacent to the golf course, is a single family, two-story residence with partial basement. This house has approximately 2,300 square feet of living area, an attached two-car garage, and a deck area. In 2007 Boone constructed a charming Chapel located on the north end of the Lodge Compound area. This chapel is situated along the banks of a flowing creek and lake area. Adjacent to the Chapel is the Memory Garden, which was constructed in 2014. There are pergolas and a beautiful stair-cased waterfall feature behind the structure. In addition to the above, the Lodge Compound includes other support structures such as storage buildings and the Hilltop House, which is a children's play house. Overall, the Lodge Compound area is the most user-friendly facility on the ranch. It is designed to house large groups for entertaining or business functions. LAKE HOUSE: Boone's Lake House has been featured in Architectural Digest Magazine and Cowboys and Indians Magazine. The Lake House contains approximately 11,500 square feet of living area and over 3,800 square feet of porches and patios. The front entry door was originally the front door to Bing Crosby's home. The upper level of the home features a large living/great room with fireplace, dining area, master bedroom and bath, 1 1/2 bathrooms, kitchen, utility room, and elevator. A spiral staircase with stone imported from France leads to the lower level where there are two guest bedrooms, three bathrooms, wine cellar and tasting room, office, exercise room, utility room, cedar closet, mechanical room, and storm/safe room. Outdoor balcony railings are bronze and all balconies and porch areas overlook astonishing water features, such as lakes, ponds, waterfalls, and aqueducts. The landscaping, topography features, and water enhancements make the Lake House truly "fit for a king." AIRPORT AND HANGAR: The airport is located on the western portion of the ranch. The runway is approximately 6,000 feet long and 100 feet wide. The airport facility was designed and built with FAA approval and meets all of their requirements and regulations. Approach lights are installed along the runway. The runway itself is constructed of one-foot thick concrete. This airport runway is designed to handle most any size private aircraft. Adjacent to the runway is a 52,600-square foot concrete tarmac, which connects the airport to the hangar. The hangar facility contains approximately 25,000 square feet with epoxy coated concrete floor. It features a heated electric hangar door opening system, an attractive lounge and restroom area downstairs and a two-bedroom, two-bathroom pilot's apartment upstairs. The entire airport complex is located within an 8-foot-high game fence constructed of 2 1/2 inch steel posts with heavy gauge net wire. In addition, the facility is equipped with a standby 350KW generator system for auxiliary power. DOG KENNEL: The Dog Kennel is located east of the Lodge complex, between the Lodge and the highway. The Kennel contains approximately 11,000 square feet of usable kennel area, with approximately 3,600 feet being enclosed and air conditioned. There are 40 chain-link dog pens, 20 on each side of a concrete center alleyway. The Kennel is equipped with full office facilities, a large meat processing-center. The facility includes a veterinary lab, upper level storage, overhead crane and bathroom. WATER FEATURES: The Canadian River itself generally forms the north boundary of the ranch for a distance of approximately 25 miles. This river bottom is wide and fertile with a shallow water table. In some areas, standing pockets of water are common and portions of the river bottom are sub-irrigated. In the early 2000's Boone began a massive water enhancement project, likely never before conceived or duplicated by a private citizen. By dredging and building a chain of dams, waterfalls, lakes, and other water enhancements, Boone created possibly the largest individual water park ever envisioned. In addition to the countless lakes and ponds, he created a flowing, man-made creek called "Boone's Creek," which basically parallels the Canadian River. By dredging into the standing water table in the Canadian River bottom, this creek was formed. Boone, however, was not satisfied with standing water in the creek and wanted ever flowing running water throughout the creek bottom. With the use of well water injected into the creek, Boone's Creek flows several thousand gallons per minute throughout this stretch of roughly 12 miles of creeks, lakes, waterfalls and ponds, all of which are man-made. With a system of pumps and pipelines, much of this water can be recirculated and used over and over. Without question, Boone has created an unmatched oasis in the Texas Panhandle. WILDLIFE: The Mesa Vista Ranch supports a variety of wildlife. Whitetail deer thrive in the productive creek bottom areas and mule deer are found throughout the sandhills, broken ridges, and mesa points on the southeast side of the ranch. Aoudad are also viewed from time to time in this rougher portion of the property. Antelope are found on the open plains country on the southwest side of the ranch. Besides quail, dove are also abundant and water fowl are seasonally present on many of the lakes. Hundreds and hundreds of turkeys are common throughout the tree-covered bottom lands. Most all of the lakes have been stocked with a variety of fish, and fishing is reported to be excellent. The southern portion of the Mesa Vista Ranch is improved with pivot sprinkler systems and irrigation wells. Portions of this land are planted in a combination of wheat and millet, providing outstanding habitat for pheasant. All in all, with the water features, varying terrain, and conservation measures in place on the Mesa Vista Ranch, it would be hard to find a better recreational property in this area of Texas. RANCH RESOURCES: Roberts County is known to have prolific saturated thickness of quality Ogallala ground water, along with substantial oil and gas resources. The Mesa Vista Ranch is located in an area of prolific quality ground water, being in the Ogallala Water Formation. Over the years, hundreds of thousands of acres of water rights have been sold in Roberts County for municipal water purposes. Recent commercial water sales in the area indicate that water rights have a commercial value in the range of $400 - $500 per acre. As previously discussed, Boone acquired the Mesa Vista Ranch in a series of purchases over the years. Boone obtained water rights in the earlier purchases, but in more recent years, as he acquired adjoining land, the commercial water rights were already sold, due to their commercial value. Overall, Boone owns approximately 42,000 acres of water rights, which will convey with the sale. This is considered to be an extremely valuable asset. In addition to this water resource, minerals are also considered to be a valuable resource in Roberts County. Like the water, Boone obtained a portion of the minerals on the earlier land purchases, but as he expanded to the east and west in more recent years, he was unable to obtain minerals with these acquisitions. There is scattered oil and gas activity on the Mesa Vista Ranch. All of Boone's owned mineral interests will convey. In 2015, Boone's oil and gas royalty income totaled approximately $2,560,000. In 2016, with oil and gas prices declining, the total royalty income dropped to approximately $771,000. For the first nine months of 2017 the royalty income is approximately $541,000. Again, all owned water rights, all owned mineral rights, and royalty will convey with the property. There are a number of large, operating wind farms located in the Texas Panhandle. All wind generation royalty rights are also included. PRICE AND REMARKS: The Boone Pickens' Mesa Vista Ranch is offered for sale at a price of $220,000,000. It seems impossible to comprehend all of the improvements made to this property, whether it is structural improvements, water enhancements, landscaping, wildlife conservation features, or others. As example, thousands of tons of landscaping rock, trees, shrubbery, plants, etc. were imported to the property over the years. Early on, Boone hired Tommy Ford, an architect from Dallas, Texas, to help in the planning, drafting, and construction of the many improvements placed on the ranch. Together, Boone and Tommy had the vision to take raw ranch land and transform this property into what now represents Mesa Vista Ranch. In a recent conversation with Tommy Ford, he estimated that the total volume of building materials, landscaping rocks, trees, and other enhancements delivered to the ranch would exceed 120 trains, with each train load containing 110 cars of materials. Having overseen most all of the major structural construction on the property, Tommy estimated replacement cost of over $140,000,000, not counting the added cost of dredging and developing the lakes and creek water systems on the property. To our knowledge, no other ranch can replicate Boone's Mesa Vista Ranch. He has spent nearly 50 years transforming this Texas Panhandle Ranch into a wildlife paradise with spectacular water features and improvements fit for a king. The sale of the Mesa Vista Ranch is basically "turn key," including all rolling stock, equipment, pick-up trucks, hunting vehicles, farming equipment, furnishings, bird dogs, etc. The only exclusions are Boone's personal effects, livestock, and his vast art collection. The livestock are available to be purchased separately, as is the majority of the art collection. "You do everything to make the land perfect, hoping the next owner has the same passion." - T. Boone Pickens Qualified buyers can schedule a showing of the property by contacting the Brokers. Offered Jointly and Exclusively By Chas. S. Middleton and Son and Hall and Hall
$220,000,000

Premier Listing

6666 Ranch
#TX465297
King, 
142,372.00 acres
Many times, in marketing ranch properties the terms "Historic Ranch", "Legendary Property", "Famous Ranch", or "Rare Offering" are over used to hype a ranch being offered for sale. Such terms should only rightly be used to describe precious few ranches. Without question, these terms truly fit the legendary 6666’s Ranch. Few, if any ranches in the United States can match the history, grandeur, and prestige of the 6666’s Ranch, which was founded in 1870. Legend has it that the history of the ranch began with a poker game and a winning hand of four sixes. In true Texas fashion, this does make a great story, but the real history of the 6666’s Ranch began with Samuel Burk Burnett, who became one of the most influential and prosperous cattlemen in the history of Texas. Samuel Burk Burnett was born in Bates County, Missouri in 1849. At the age of 19, Burk purchased 100 head of cattle which had been branded with the 6666’s brand. Soon thereafter, he started leasing and ultimately purchasing ranches and expanding his ranching operation. Around 1900, he purchased the 8 Ranch near Guthrie, Texas in King County. He soon purchased the Dixon Creek Ranch in the Texas Panhandle and also began to expand the 8 Ranch into what now is known as the 6666’s Ranch. In 1917 he decided to build “The finest ranch house in West Texas” at Guthrie. This stately home still stands as the main house at the 6666’s Ranch. It is told that the house cost $100,000, which was considered to be an enormous amount of money at that time. The house was constructed of stone quarried rock and other materials which were hauled by wagon to Guthrie. Early day visitors to the home included President Roosevelt, Will Rogers and the Indian Chief Quanah Parker. In 1921, oil was discovered on the Dixon Creek Ranch and in 1969, a major oil field was discovered on the 6666’s Ranch. Samuel Burk Burnett passed away in 1922. Prior to his death, he willed the bulk of his estate to his daughter, Anne Valliant Burnett in a Trusteeship for her yet unborn grandchild, Anne Burnett Marion. In 1980, when Anne Valliant Burnett Tandy passed away, the majority of her estate went to her daughter, Anne Burnett Marion, through this Trusteeship. Mrs. Marion assumed management of the 6666’s Ranch in 1980 and took a very hands-on interest in the management of the property and all of the 6666’s holdings. Sadly, Anne Marion passed away on February 11, 2020, and terms of her will dictated all of her ranching operations would be sold. Anne Burnett Marion “Little Anne” grew up spending her summers on the 6666’s Ranch. She was focused and dedicated to this ranching empire and was very active in the management of these ranches. She was highly respected by her peers. Mrs. Marion was a director emeritus at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum and was inducted into its Hall of Great Westerners in 2009. Her great-grandfather, Samuel Burk Burnett; her grandfather, Tom Burnett; and her mother, Anne Burnett Tandy; are also Hall of Fame inductees there. Individual honors include the Golden Deed Honoree as selected by the Fort Worth Exchange Club, 1993; The Charles Goodnight Award, 1993; induction into the Texas Business Hall of Fame, 1996; The Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts award, 1996; the American Quarter Horse Association Merle Wood Humanitarian Award, 1999; the National Golden Spur Award, 2001; the Boss of the Plains Award from the National Ranching Heritage Center, 2003; induction into the American Quarter Horse Association Hall of Fame, 2007; and induction into the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame, 2014. During her years overseeing the management of the 6666’s Ranches, Mrs. Marion felt a strong responsibility towards the improvement of the land and water resources. She had a love for the land and ranching was in her blood. During her tenure, the 6666’s Ranches attained a national reputation for fine quarter horses and quality cattle. Away from the ranch, she was known as an astute businesswoman, a philanthropist and was highly regarded as an arts patron. Now, due to the passing of Anne Burnett Marion, for the first time ever, the historic 6666’s Ranch at Guthrie, Texas is offered for sale. Location of the 6666’s Ranch The 6666’s Ranch contains 142,372 acres, more or less, and is located in King County, Texas, which is in the Rolling Plains Region of the state. The small community of Guthrie, which is the county seat, has a population of approximately 350 people. Guthrie is located near the center of the property, and the 6666’s Ranch basically surrounds the community. Average temperatures in the county range from a minimum of 27 degrees in January to a maximum average of 99 degrees in July. The growing season averages 219 days and average precipitation is approximately 22 inches. Lubbock, Texas is 95 miles to the west, Wichita Falls is 115 miles to the east, and Fort Worth is 200 miles to the southeast. Description of the 6666’s Ranch Being one of the largest ranches in Texas, the 6666’s Ranch comprises 142,372 acres, more or less. To put this massive ranch in perspective, the ranch encompasses almost 225 square miles of land. The ranch generally measures approximately 20 miles long from north to south and around 12 miles wide from east to west. Approximately 1,000 acres of the ranch are in cultivation and farmed on a dryland basis. This land is typically farmed in wheat for seasonal grazing. Approximately 700 acres have been reseeded to improved bluestem pasture. The remainder of the ranch, being over 140,000 acres, remains in native pasture. The topography of the 6666’s Ranch varies from fairly level and gently rolling to rough, broken and eroded country draining to creek bottoms. Elevations on the ranch range from approximately 2,000 feet on the north and northwest sides of the property to around 1,600 feet in the creek bottoms in the southeast corner of the ranch. Five major creek bottom drainages run through the ranch, all draining in an easterly to sometimes southeasterly direction. Beginning at the far north end of the ranch, Farrer Creek runs through the northeast corner of the property for approximately one mile. Approximately five miles to the south, the Middle Fork of the Wichita River runs through the ranch for a distance of approximately eight miles. Then, approximately five miles further to the south, Willow Creek runs through the entirety of the ranch for approximately ten miles. As previously discussed, the community of Guthrie and the 6666’s Headquarters are located near the center of the ranch. The South Wichita River enters the property on the west side and meanders through the entire central portion of the ranch, through Guthrie, then further east, exiting the ranch on the far east boundary. Then, towards the far south side of the ranch North Croton Creek enters the property near the southwest corner and winds through the entire southern portion of the ranch, exiting the property at the southeast corner. In addition to these five major drainages, there are numerous tributary drainages, side creeks, draws and ravines. Seasonal holes, along with year-round live water are found in these various creeks. During the hot summer months, water in these creeks becomes salty and is typically not suitable for livestock consumption, unless the water is freshened by rain runoff. During the cooler seasons, the water becomes more potable. Some areas of the ranch have sandy or sandy loam soils, with other areas transitioning to red clay and less productive, scaldy more marginal soils. Mesquite is common in the more productive portions of the ranch with cedar being the predominate invader in the more rocky, broken soils. Lower valley areas have soapberry, willows and hackberry trees in the creek bottom areas. The ranch has an ongoing brush control program in place, generally spending approximately $100,000 per year on mesquite spraying, plus the use of front-end loaders to grub and stack cedar. This program has been very successful and the ranch has been recognized for the brush control conservation work done on the property. The native turf is in overall good condition and the ranch has been well managed over the years. The 6666’s Ranch is fenced and cross fenced into many pastures, traps and fields. The 6666’s Headquarters, which are located at and around Guthrie have considerable pipe fencing around barns, outbuildings, etc. Immediately south and west of the Headquarter improvements is the 6666’s Horse Division. There are multiple barns, stalls and related improvements located at the Horse Division. Much of the fencing at this division is also of pipe construction. The remainder of the ranch has 5 and 6 wire barbed wire fencing with steel T posts and cedar stave fencing. Typically, the ranch pasture fencing has pipe corners, pipe stretch posts and pipe gate posts construction. Overall, all fencing on the 6666’s Ranch has been well maintained and is considered to be of superior quality to the typical ranch property in this area. As previously discussed, there are multiple lots, pen areas, and traps around the Headquarters and the Horse Division. Most of the cultivated land and the improved bluestem pasture is located in and around the Horse Division. Away from this area of the ranch, 5 and 6 wire barbed wire fencing is typical. This area of the ranch comprises approximately 140,000 acres. This includes approximately 30 pastures and 20–25 traps. The pastures typically range from approximately 900 acres to almost 10,000 acres each and the traps typically range from just less than 100 acres to just less than 1,000 acres. Historically, developed water has been a limiting factor on the 6666’s Ranch, King County and this general area of the Texas Rolling Plains. Well water is sometimes difficult to locate and it is possible that a well driller will drill a dry hole. When well water is located it is typically of poor quality and of limited quantity. A typical windmill, domestic well or livestock well will be of several gallons per minute capacity and have high mineral deposits. Natives in the area refer to the high mineral content as “gypy water”. This means the high mineral content of the water can make the water unsuitable for human consumption and also means the mineral content causes mineral deposits to form on waterlines, water hydrants, water troughs, etc. This also means that a water heater or dishwasher will have mineral deposits form, causing the heater/dishwasher to only last for a short period of time before it needs to be replaced. This poor-quality water was a way of life for area residents for many years. In the 1970’s, the Federal Government initiated Federal funds for community rural water systems. In this area of Texas, the King/Cottle Rural Water System was formed. Federal funding was approved to purchase water rights near the King/Cottle County line. There is an area of fairly large quantity irrigation water between Guthrie and Paducah. Water rights were purchased in this area and landowners throughout Cottle and King Counties agreed to purchase water meters, whereby water could be piped to their property and the landowner would pay for the use of this metered water. The King/Cottle Rural Waterline was considered to be a major enhancement for rural landowners in this area of Texas. Also, during this time frame a similar water system, known as the Red River Rural Water System was formed, and a portion of the ranch accessed this water system. Hundreds of miles of waterlines were installed and ultimately paid for by water meter usage from these area landowners. The 6666’s Ranch was a major purchaser of these water meters. This water was piped to the 6666’s Camps, Headquarters and to many multiple livestock drinking troughs throughout the ranch. This water system was and has been a tremendous enhancement to the 6666’s Ranch and to area farms and ranches. Because of the substantial demand for water, this system has been operating at maximum capacity for many years, and now, the 100’s of miles of waterlines are experiencing leaks and capacity issues, causing constant maintenance to this water system. It should also be mentioned that while this water source is of fairly strong capacity, the quality of the water is marginal. In recent years, as RO Water Systems have become available, many landowners have installed RO Systems. Approximately 15 years ago, Anne Marion made the decision to install a large, state-of-the-art water filtration plant at the ranch. As a source for this water system, two water wells were leased north of the 6666’s Ranch. It is reported that one of the wells produces approximately 300 gallons per minute, and the other well, which is generally used as a backup, produces approximately 130 gallons per minute. This water system is located near the north end of the ranch and comprises an elaborate filtration system, water storage reservoirs, pumps, the housing around the system, and miles of private waterline used to transport this water to major portions of the ranch. In some areas, this water actually gravity flows, while in other areas it is forced by pumping stations. It is reported that this water system cleanses the raw well water to a point where it is considered to be bottled drinking water quality. This has been a major enhancement for the ranch. In addition to the above, other water sources include untreated water wells, which are suitable for livestock, dirt tanks, some of which are seasonal and others are generally considered to be a year-round water source, along with live creek water in places. Again, the above described water system and associated waterlines are considered to be the major source of water on the ranch. Now, with the addition of this extensive water system, the 6666’s Ranch is considered to be very well watered when compared to the typical ranch in this area. The 6666’s Ranch has substantial structural improvements, much more than any other ranch in this area of Texas; however, these structural improvements are spread over 142,000 acres of land and are fitting for a ranch of this history and magnitude. The structural improvements are primarily located in four areas. These include the North Camp, which is near the north boundary of the ranch; the South Camp, near the south boundary of the ranch; the main Headquarters in an around Guthrie, Texas, near the center of the ranch; and the Horse Division improvements, located just south and west of the main Headquarters. The North Camp and the South Camp Improvements both include a camp manager’s home, a bunkhouse and a metal barn. These improvements are very functional. Substantial structural improvements are located at the headquarters. Probably the most famous and most prominent structural improvement is the “Big House”. This beautiful three-story rock home dominates the Headquarters Compound, and the landscaped grounds surrounding the home compliment the setting. Totally, the home contains approximately 13,280 square feet of living area. Historically, the current ranch manager and his family live in one portion of the home and Mrs. Marion and her family/guests utilized a separate area of the home. The home contains 13 bedrooms, 13 baths, 3 powder rooms, 2 kitchens, dining room and 3 fireplaces. Over the years, a number of the nation’s most successful business people and politicians, including Presidents of the United States have stayed in this historic home. Additional improvements at the main Headquarters include the pilot’s quarters, 2 bunk houses, the famous 6666’s loft barn, several horse sheds, shop building, equipment storage, feed building, round pen, dog kennel, two laborer houses, approximately 20 employee houses, the 6666’s Supply House, a 3,600 square foot enclosed airplane hangar and a 65 foot x 6,000 foot asphalt lighted private landing strip. The impressive Horse Division improvements are located immediately across the highway to the south. These improvements include the nearly 17,000 square foot main office building, Doc’s home, the cook house, employee house, 2 bunk houses, 3 stud barns, 3 separate stables, the race barn, the mare motel, 2 horse barns, the alfalfa barn, round pen, horse walkers, and the nearly new 48,750 square foot covered arena. In addition to these major structural improvements there are 28 sets of pipe construction working and/or shipping pens located over the ranch. There are 2 sets of scales. Most all structural improvements are extremely well maintained. The 6666’s Ranch has historically been operated as a cow/calf cattle ranch, and in more recent years, a separate horse division has been established and is now a major component of the overall ranching operation. The cattle division of the 6666’s Ranch is overseen and managed by Joe Leathers, General Ranch Manager. Joe and his family live in a portion of the main home. Joe also oversees the management of the 6666’s Dixon Creek Ranch and Frisco Creek Ranch. The cattle division of the 6666’s Ranch typically consists of 4,000–4,300 cows, several hundred replacement heifers, around 200 bulls and all needed ranch horses for operation of the cattle division. Under the typical cattle operation, bulls are turned out with the cow herd on about April 1st for a 60-day period. The calves are weaned in October. The steer calves typically weigh 650–700 pounds, with the heifers weighing around 60 pounds less. The calves are shipped to the 6666 Frisco Creek Ranch where they are run for another 45 days or so. At this ranch, the cattle are placed on a combination of native pasture, irrigated pasture and a supplemental all-natural feed program (backgrounding) where the cattle are grown to a weight of approximately 800 pounds. The cattle are then shipped to Mc6 Feeders, north of Hereford, Texas where they are placed on an all-natural finished feed ration. The 6666’s partners with 44 Farms and Walmart under a program called Prime Pursuits. Cattle in this program are all natural and marketed through Walmart. This program markets cattle at a 10-12 per pound premium over the typical cash market. Also, as part of the ranching operation, the cattle ranching division of the 6666’s Ranch typically operates around 133,000–135,000 acres of the ranch and the horse division typically operates around 8,000–10,000 acres of the property. The Horse Division is managed and overseen by Glenn Blodgett, DVM. This is a large horse operation, with a ranch horse division and a racing horse division. This operation includes stallions and mares owned by the 6666’s Ranch, including recipient mares, which are used as a surrogate, to take the fertilized egg from prize winning/expensive mares/stallions. Some of the stallions are owned solely by the ranch, while some are in partnership and some are owned by other parties. Likewise, the ranch also boards mares owned by other parties, kept at the ranch for breeding purposes, or kept year-round at the ranch. As previously discussed, the Horse Division typically operates 8,000–10,000 acres of the total ranch, principally being that area of the ranch in close proximity to the Horse Division improvements. This includes the 700 acres+/- of bluestem pasture and the 1,000 acres+/- typically planted in wheat. Each Fall the 6666’s Ranch hosts the Return to the Remuda Sale. This sale features horses from the 6666’s Ranch and some of Texas’ most historic ranches, including Beggs Cattle Company, Pitchfork Land and Cattle, Waggoner Ranch, Tongue River Ranch and guest consigners, such as the King Ranch, Wagonhound Land & Livestock, and Circle Bar Ranch. Thousands of people attend this annual sale and millions of dollars are paid for these outstanding horses. In addition to the cattle and horse operation, the 6666’s Ranch is located in an area offering outstanding whitetail deer hunting, quail, dove, feral hogs and predators, such as coyotes and an occasional mountain lion. No commercial hunting has ever been allowed on the property. Mrs. Marion enjoyed hunting and used the property as a place to personally hunt and invite family members and friends to the property for hunting. It is rare to find a property of this magnitude where commercial hunting has never been allowed. There is scattered oil production found on portions of the property. Much of the ranch has no production and where production is located, the well sites and roads have been well maintained and the production is not unsightly. All minerals are owned and one-quarter of the minerals are offered with the sale of the ranch. Royalty income has averaged approximately $400,000 - $500,000 per year for the past three years, and one-quarter (1/4) of this amount will convey. Currently, very little oil production is located on the 6666’s Ranch. In 2018, Burnett Oil Company leased the mineral rights under approximately 140,000 acres of the existing 6666’s Ranch (a copy of this mineral lease is available). Several producing wells have been drilled and this lease appears to be promising for additional development. As these minerals are developed, additional royalty income will be generated. There is no solar development or wind farm development on the ranch and 100% of the solar rights and wind generation royalty rights will convey with the sale. Property taxes are approximately $157,000 per year. It goes without saying that we are extremely honored to represent the 6666’s Ranch in the sale of this truly historic ranch property. This outstanding offering is realistically priced at $1,350 per acre, which includes one-quarter of the minerals along with all solar and wind generation rights. We have a detailed inventory of cattle, horses, rolling stock, equipment and other personal items, all of which are available to be purchased separately. The 6666’s Ranch is now available for the first time ever. This historic property was established 150 years ago and only about once in a lifetime does a ranch of this scale and significance come on the market. This is a rare opportunity to own a great piece of Texas history.
$192,202,200

Premier Listing

6666 Dixon Creek Ranch Division
#TX465301
Hutchinson, 
114,455.00 acres
*Offered collectively as a package with the 6666 Ranch and 6666 Frisco Creek Ranch Division. This historic ranch takes its name from the creek where noted buffalo hunter and Indian scout, Billy Dixon established the first dugout home on the High Plains in 1874. The Dixon Creek Ranch has historically served as a major division of the 6666’s Ranch since 1903 when it was purchased by Samuel Burk Burnett, legendary founder of the 6666’s Ranches empire. Burk Burnett operated the Dixon Creek Ranch in conjunction with the 6666’s Ranch he owned and operated in King County, Texas, near Guthrie. The first oil well drilled in the Texas Panhandle was completed on the 6666’s Dixon Creek Ranch on May 2, 1921. Burk Burnett passed away in 1922. In October, 1923 the first rotary drilling rig ever used in the Texas Panhandle drilled an oil well on the property. In 1980, Burk Burnett’s Granddaughter, Anne Burnett Marion assumed management of all of the 6666’s Ranches, which included the Dixon Creek Ranch. Mrs. Marion was very active in the ranching industry and took a very hands-on interest in all of the 6666’s holdings. Sadly, Anne Burnett Marion passed away on February 11, 2020, and now for the first time ever, the famed Dixon Creek Ranch Division of the 6666’s Ranches is offered for sale. The Dixon Creek Ranch is located in the heart of the Texas Panhandle, being approximately 50 miles northeast of Amarillo, Texas. The north end of the ranch is basically adjacent to the oil rich town of Borger, with a population of approximately 15,000. Access to the ranch is provided by substantial paved highway frontage and county roads. Other than the paved highways and railroad easement, all other roads through the ranch are serviced by locked gates, allowing no public access. There is a substantial amount of oil and gas production over major portions of the ranch, but again, access to this production is through locked gates. Elevations on the Dixon Creek Ranch range from just under 3,000 feet to approximately 3,500 feet above sea level. Annual precipitation is in the range of 22 inches, which includes the likelihood of snow in the winter. Much of the Dixon Creek Ranch is described as an open grass prairie land, generally draining to the north. The predominant drainage through the property is Dixon Creek and its tributaries. Dixon Creek and its side drainages become more predominant, more broken and deeper towards the north end of the ranch. Hackberry Trees, Cottonwoods and Willows become common in the creek bottom areas, with Cedar scattered along the ridgelines and side slopes between the creek bottoms and upland prairies. Live water is found throughout many areas of Dixon Creek. The creek areas are scenic, productive, and offer good wildlife habitat. Many areas in the creek bottoms also have scattered Plum Thickets, Soap Berry Trees and Sumac. The open prairie land portion of the ranch, which is the majority of the property, has very little brush cover, with only scattered Beargrass and an occasional Mesquite. Portions of the ranch have sandier soils, and Sand Sage and Shin Oak are common in the sandier hummocky areas. Soils throughout the ranch range from deep hardlands, loam and clay loam to sandy loam and sandhills. The ranch has a desirable mix of palatable native grasses and the property has been well managed over the years. Near the southwest corner of the property 6 pivot sprinkler systems have been developed, irrigating approximately 2,900 acres. The Dixon Creek Ranch is located above a strong volume, good quality groundwater formation, known as the Ogallala Formation. The 6 pivot sprinklers are all basically one-half mile in length and 5 of these pivots cover approximately 500 wet acres and 1 pivot covers approximately 400 wet acres. Nine irrigation wells, all powered by electric turbine motors are used to irrigate these 6 pivots. Under current management, 4 of the pivot circles are typically planted in wheat and 2 of the circles are generally farmed one-half in wheat and one-half in hay grazer. Three of the pivots are nozzled at 1,000 gallons per minute each, and 1 irrigation well is used at each of these 3 pivots. An additional pivot is nozzled at 1,000 gallons per minute and 2 irrigation wells are used at this pivot. Two additional pivots are nozzled at 1,500 gallons per minute each. These 2 pivots are watered by 2 wells each. Totally it is estimated that the 9 irrigation wells produce approximately 7,000 gallons per minute. The Dixon Creek Ranch is located in the Panhandle Groundwater District. Irrigation wells in this district are permitted and monitored by the Panhandle Groundwater District. This district measures the saturated thickness of the water formation and depth to water. As previously stated, Samuel Burk Burnett passed away in 1922, just as the oil production was beginning to be developed on the property. In 1926, his estate entered into a water lease agreement with Phillips Petroleum Company covering 3,200 acres of the ranch. The original 1926 Water Lease called for Phillips Petroleum to pay the ranch $5,000 per year for the right to extract ground water from these five sections and pipe this water to the Phillips Refinery near Borger. In 1981 the Lease was re-negotiated to a price of $84,000 per year. Each year the Lease payment increases and in 2020 the annual lease payment was $164,000. This Lease continues to increase in the upcoming years and in 2030 the payment will be $191,000. The ranch has the right to tie into these waterlines and use this water for livestock purposes. The ranch has private waterlines tied to the oil company waterlines. These waterlines service livestock drinking troughs as a major water source throughout the southwestern portion of the ranch. A copy of this Water Lease is available upon request. In addition to the above described water source, the remainder of the ranch is watered by windmills, electric submersible water wells and solar wells. Additionally, as previously mentioned, live water is found in Dixon Creek. Overall, the ranch is considered to be very well watered and the water is of good quality. The Dixon Creek Ranch is fenced and cross fenced and most all of the fences are of 5 wire construction with steel T posts and twisted wire staves. Some of the fences have steel T posts and treated wood posts. The ranch is fenced and cross fenced into approximately 30 pastures with numerous smaller shipping and holding traps. The largest pasture on the ranch contains just over 10,000 acres. In the past 15 years, several major grass fires have occurred in the area and on portions of the Dixon Creek Ranch. A considerable amount of new fencing has been installed due to these fires. There are 6 pivot sprinklers systems located in the southwest corner of the ranch and each of the pivots are fenced separately. Because grazing pressure from livestock creates significant numbers of cattle on these irrigated pivots, all of these fences are of 6 wire construction with steel T posts and cedar staves. Overall, the fences on the Dixon Creek Ranch are considered to be in good to excellent condition. The 6666’s Dixon Creek Ranch is very well improved with structural improvements being much superior to the typical ranch in the Texas Panhandle. For the most part, all structural improvements have been very well maintained. The majority of the improvements are located at the headquarters, which are found near the center of the ranch. Structural improvements at the main headquarters include four employee houses, the nearly 7,000 square foot owner’s home, the bunkhouse, several barns, stalls, main shipping pens and roping arena. In addition to these major improvements there are four camps on the ranch, all of which include employee houses and barns. The Dixon Creek Ranch is principally operated as a cow/calf ranching unit. The current stocking rate is approximately 2,650 mother cows, 58 ranch horses and 184 bulls. Because of the 100-year drought in 2011 through 2013, the stocking rate was lowered substantially and the cattle numbers are now being increased to normal stocking rates. During this process, the ranch is pasturing yearling cattle in addition to the cow/calf operation. There is very little Mesquite and/or Cedar infestations on the Dixon Creek Ranch. The two principal invaders are Beargrass and Prairie Dogs. The ranch spends $50,000 - $60,000 per year to control/eradicate Beargrass and Prairie Dogs. The Dixon Creek Ranch is recognized as one of the most productive and efficient grass ranches in the Texas Panhandle. Because brush eradication is not a problem, the economics of cattle ranching on the Dixon Creek Ranch add to the overall reputation of the property. Even though the majority of the ranch has a very open appearance, good wildlife habitat is found throughout the Dixon Creek drainages. Deer and Turkey are common in these more protected areas of the ranch. No commercial hunting has ever been allowed on the property. Production of oil and gas is found over most portions of the property. As previously mentioned, this production was originally found in the 1920’s, approximately 100 years ago, and is still very prolific. Many years ago, the Burnett Family gifted one-half of the minerals to Texas Christian University. The ranch still owns a full one-half of the mineral interest, and annual royalty for the one-half mineral interest has averaged slightly over $2,000,000 per year for the past three years. The seller will convey one-half of their current mineral ownership, which is a full one-quarter mineral interest. Property taxes are approximately $120,000 per year, or just over $1.00 per acre. The Dixon Creek Ranch is now offered for sale for the first time ever. This is an historic reputation ranch any cattleman would be proud to own. All fences, structural improvements and water facilities are immaculate. No expenditure for repairs and maintenance is needed to take over the operation of this ranch. The Dixon Creek Ranch is offered for sale at $1,200 per acre, including one-quarter of the minerals along with all solar and wind generation rights. Mrs. Marion was never interested in developing the wind generation rights on this ranch. Without question, the ranch is located in the “sweet spot” for wind farm development. Wind generation towers adjoin the ranch for miles and miles. It is an honor to represent the 6666’s Ranches in the sale of their prized Dixon Creek Ranch. We have a complete inventory of cattle, horses, rolling stock, equipment and other personal items, all of which are available to be purchased separately. This significant offering deserves your immediate attention if you are in the market for arguably the best improved quality cattle ranch in the Texas Panhandle.
$137,346,000

Premier Listing

Matador Ranch
#TX457542
Cottle, 
131,000.00 acres
THE MATADOR CATTLE COMPANY 131,000 ACRES, MORE OR LESS MOTLEY, FLOYD, CROSBY, DICKENS, AND COTTLE COUNTIES, TEXAS Centered around the community of Matador, Texas, the sprawling Matador Ranch is steeped in history and today remains one of the most historic ranches in Texas, along with the King Ranch, Waggoner Ranch, 6666’s Ranch and Pitchfork Ranch. In December 1882, the Matador Land and Cattle Company was formed by a Scottish syndicate, which acquired approximately 1.5 million acres in Motley, Floyd, Crosby, Dickens and Cottle Counties.  By 1951, the acreage had been reduced to approximately 800,000 acres, which was sold to Lazard Freres and Company of London.  This development company subdivided these massive holdings and in 1952, Fred C. Koch, co-founder of Koch Industries, Inc., purchased the Matador’s Flying V cattle brand and the “50” horse brand, which had been used by the Scots during their 70-year ownership of the Matador Ranch.  Simultaneously, Mr. Koch acquired the Matador Ranch Headquarter Division, the Wolf Creek Division, and the Russellville Division, all centered around Matador. In the 1970’s he purchased the Lucky Knob and Tee Pee City Divisions of the Matador.  The Matador Headquarters Division features a 7,000 square foot, stone structure headquarters home/office.  The exterior stone walls are 24 inches thick and were built from rock quarried from the ranch and hauled to the ranch headquarters.  This structure was built in 1917 and is now over 100 years old.  This stately stone structure has been well maintained and continues to serve as the home for the general ranch manager and also as the business office.  The nearby Matador Cook House was also built in 1917 and is of similar construction. Since the original 1952 purchase by Mr. Koch, opportunities arose to purchase additional divisions of the Matador Ranch.  Today, besides the original Headquarters Division (approximately 36,429 acres), the ranch now comprises the Wolf Creek Division (approximately 21,379 acres) on the southwest side of the ranch, the Tee Pee City/Lucky Knob Division (approximately 41,077 acres), located to the northeast and the Russellville Division (approximately 31,962 acres), positioned southeast of the Headquarters Division, all together totaling approximately 130,846 acres. The far western edge of the ranch extends to the level Plains country above the Caprock Escarpment.  To the east of the Caprock, the majority of the ranch is identified as being in the Rolling Plains Region of Texas.  This portion of the ranch has a hilly and often rolling topography draining to numerous lower creek drainages.  Over the years, the ranch has had an ongoing brush control program, with brush being mechanically eradicated, aerially sprayed, and raked and stacked in some areas.  More recently, a new chemical just approved called “Invora” has been applied by aerial application in a thick Mesquite/Juniper bottom area.  Initial results indicate a very good kill rate for this new chemical. The Matador Ranch is nationally recognized for its quality cattle operation, typically maintaining a commercial cow/calf operation of 3,000 – 3,500 cows, plus 450 - 500 replacement heifers and 180 - 200 bulls.  By maintaining a very conservative cow herd of this size, in typical years the ranch can also run 1,200 – 1,500 stocker cattle.  The cow herd is a Hereford/Angus cross of Black Baldy Cows, with Charolais, Hereford and Angus Bulls used to produce high demand quality calves.  In addition to the cattle operation, the ranch maintains a horse operation consisting of ranch horses for the employees, broodmares and stallions.  The ranch maintains around 20 – 25 broodmares and 4 stallions.  The horse operation focuses on producing quality ranch horses with outstanding cow sense, good dispositions and the ability to traverse rugged terrain.  As a testament to the success of the horse breeding program, in 2013 the Matador Ranch received the Best Remuda Award from the American Quarter Horse Association and AQHA Corporate Partner, Zoetis. The philosophy of the Koch Family has always been to preserve, improve and protect the land.  The excellent ranch management, coupled with outstanding wildlife management, have transformed the Matador Ranch into one of the premier ranches in Texas.  Management has focused on land stewardship in the form of invading brush control through mechanical and aerial eradication, along with prescribed burns from time to time used to eliminate invasive plant species.  This brush control not only improves and increases livestock grazing, but also provides more desirable habitat for wildlife.  Additionally, water features have been improved and added, which helps distribute livestock throughout the ranch for better grazing practices.  The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s 2010 Lone Star Land Steward Award was awarded to the Matador Ranch recognizing their outstanding land stewardship practices.  Other land stewardship honors include: • 2010 Outstanding Rangeland Stewardship Award from      the Texas Section Society for Range Management/Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association • 2011 Region 4 Winner in the Environmental Stewardship Award Program sponsored by the Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, US Fish and Wildlife, Dow AgroSciences, National Cattlemen’s Foundation, and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association • Koch Industries’ 2012 Environmental Health & Safety Excellence Award • 2019 Beef Quality Assurance Cow/Calf Award Matador Ranch Description The Matador Ranch is located approximately 75 miles northeast of Lubbock, Texas and 120 miles southeast of Amarillo.  The ranch centers around Matador, Texas, the county seat of Motley County. Nearly all of the ranch is located in Motley County, but the west end of the ranch extends into Floyd County, the southwest corner of the ranch extends into Crosby and Dickens Counties and the far east edge of the property extends into Cottle County.  All divisions of the ranch have a combination of paved and graded county road access. The ranch is located in a desirable ranching area with precipitation averaging 22 – 24 inches per year.  Generally, the ranch receives 5 – 6 inches of snow through the winter months. Most of the precipitation occurs in May and June, with July and August being hot and dry.  In the fall the ranch generally receives beneficial rains, growing strong grass lasting through the winter months.  Most ranchers in this area run a cow/calf operation with supplemental protein feeding through the winter months.  The Matador Ranch has a conservative stocking rate so that stocker/yearling cattle can also be run in years of favorable moisture. Wolf Creek Division The Wolf Creek Division contains approximately 21,379 acres and is located approximately 6 miles west of the small community of Roaring Springs, or about 10 miles southwest of Matador.  Several thousand acres on the extreme west end are located on the level plains above the Caprock Escarpment.  Portions of this area were in cultivation at one time, but are now reseeded to improved bluestem pasture.  Other areas on the plains remain in native pasture.  All of the plains country has an open appearance with very little brush invasion.  Elevations on the plains country are approximately 3,000 feet.  The property descends from the level upland plains country to the Rolling Plains under the Caprock edge.  The terrain becomes broken below the Caprock with caliche, limestone and gravelly hills draining eastwardly.  Juniper is scattered throughout this broken country, mostly on the ridgelines and steeper drainages.  The major drainage below the Caprock is Wolf Creek, which heads just below the Caprock Escarpment and drains in a southeasterly direction through the ranch for a distance of approximately 7 – 8 miles.  This live flowing spring fed creek exits the ranch near the southeast corner.  The entire creek bottom is extremely scenic and very productive with much of the sandy bottom being subirrigated.  Sand Sage and Plum thickets are common in the creek bottom. Cottonwood trees, Hackberry trees, Willows and Soapberry trees are scattered all along the creek bottoms.  Elevation near the southeast corner of the ranch where Wolf Creek exits the property is approximately 2,600 feet.  Away from the creek the property elevates with gravelly rolling hills, scattered bluffs and draws draining to the creek.  This area of the ranch has a good turf of native grasses with a scattered to moderate canopy of Mesquite, Shin Oak, Hackberry and Juniper in the rougher areas. Further to the east, sandstone ridges are common above the creek with rolling sandy loam soils over a large area of this portion of the ranch.  Mesquite canopies are scattered to moderate with Sage and Shin Oak in the sandier areas.  A commercial gravel pit is located just south of the state highway and from time to time gravel mined from this pit generates additional cash flow to the ranch.  A paved state highway adjoins the north boundary of the Wolf Creek Division.  The plains country is partitioned into 8 – 10 pastures and the country below the Caprock is partitioned into approximately 6 pastures and several traps. Approximately 1,000 acres are high game fenced.  To accommodate hunters with a desire for even more superior deer than the natural genetics of the Rolling Plains, the ranch introduced superior whitetail deer in this high game fence area. The Wolf Creek Division is improved by two large sets of shipping pens with scales and hydraulic chute.  This Division is well watered by live creek water, pitted playa lakes, dirt tanks, wells and an extensive waterline network with drinking troughs.   The Wolf Creek Camp House, barn and pens are located on the highway on a separate 160-acre tract.  The manager of the Wolf Creek Division resides at this camp house. The Headquarters Division The Headquarters Division is immediately northeast of the Wolf Creek Division and this portion of the ranch is located just west and south of the Matador community.  The Headquarters Division contains approximately 36,429 acres.  This portion of the ranch has substantial highway frontage and also includes the historic Matador Headquarters stone house/office, cook house and main ranch shipping pens.  In addition to the main rock house, there are several employee houses on this Division.  In recent years, the Matador Lodge was constructed and added to the Headquarters Division.  The primary use of this lodge is to house commercial hunters, but it is also used for corporate meetings, weddings, family reunions and other similar functions.  The lodge is well constructed and features a large commercial kitchen, large great room with fireplace, eating area and 12 guest rooms with each room having full bath facilities.  There is also a store in the lodge where the ranch markets “Matador” caps, shirts, vests, and other Matador items for customers to purchase.  Just outside of the lodge is a covered barbecue pavilion with large fire pit, perfect for outdoor cooking.  The topography of the Headquarters Division is generally rolling and hilly, complemented by several elevated ridges overlooking creek and river bottom areas.  Dutchman Creek runs through the southern portion of the Headquarters Division and the Middle Pease River meanders through the north end of the ranch.  Seasonal holes of water can be found in Dutchman Creek and live water is found along the Pease, depending on the season.  Plum thickets are common.  Salt Creek is located south of the Pease and this area has a high-water table with surface water present at times.  Cottonwood, Soapberry, Hackberry and Willows are scattered throughout the lower creek bottom areas.  The historic Ballard Springs are found near the Headquarters compound and a mile or so to the west Hackberry Springs flows a strong volume of live water.  Elevations on the Headquarters Division range from 2,600 to 2,800 feet. The more broken portions of this section of the ranch have sandstone rock outcrops and gravelly hillsides.  Juniper is found in the rougher areas.  The majority of the country has sandy and sandy loam soils with Mesquite, Sage and Shin Oak scattered throughout.  All of the Headquarters Division is in native pasture with the exception of several hundred acres of improved Love Grass fields.  The Headquarters Division is fenced into five main pastures north of the highway and approximately 15 pastures and traps to the south.  There are numerous working/branding pens and main shipping pens equipped with scales and hydraulic chutes.  The Headquarters Division is watered by wells, an extensive waterline network with drinking troughs, dirt tanks and live spring and creek water.  The Russellville Division This Division of the Matador Ranch contains approximately 31,962 acres and is located southeast of Matador.  Access to this portion of the property is by paved highways and graded county roads.  The Russellville Camp is located in the south-central portion of this Division.  These camp improvements consist of the Russellville Manager’s Home, outbuildings and a very large set of shipping pens equipped with scales and hydraulic chute.   The west portion of this Division is described as fairly level and gently rolling country with deep productive soils.  This area has a solid turf of native grasses.  There were several small cultivated fields on this portion of the ranch and they are now seeded to improved grasses.  This portion of the ranch has varying concentrations of Mesquite.  Much of the neighboring land around this portion of the ranch is in cultivation, being farmed in cotton and wheat. To the east, the country becomes more sloping with pronounced drainages.  Mesquite is scattered through this portion of the ranch, as is Sand Sage and Shin Oak.  Towards the center of this Division the terrain becomes more broken, finally transitioning to rough breaks, canyons and ridgelines on the far east side of the property.  Juniper is more prevalent in this area of the ranch.  The western and northern portions of the Russellville Division generally have clay loam and sandy loam soils.  The more broken canyon country on the southeast portion of the ranch has red clay soils. The property is fenced and cross-fenced into approximately 25 pastures and traps.  Water is furnished by wells and an extensive waterline network with numerous drinking troughs and dirt tanks.  Even though portions of the Russellville Division are considered to be rough and broken, the waterline network is extended throughout major portions of this area of the ranch making the property very well-watered. Elevations range from approximately 2,000 to 2,800 feet. The Tee Pee City/Lucky Knob Division This Division of the ranch contains approximately 41,077 acres, making it the largest division of the Matador Ranch.  This unit is located northeast of Matador, approximately five miles northeast of the Russellville Division.  Access to the property is by paved highway on the west and graded county road on the south. The Middle Pease River enters the ranch on the west side and meanders through a major portion of the property for a distance of approximately 10 miles, exiting the ranch on the northeast side.  West of the river the elevated upland areas of the ranch are mostly loamy and clay loam soils with sandy bottomland in the draws and major drainage areas.  An extremely steep, rugged and deep narrow canyon known as the “Ditch” enters the west central side of the ranch, running in an easterly direction and merging with the Pease River in the center of the property.  In places this deep ditch serves as a natural barrier and can only be crossed by vehicle in a couple of places.  This rugged area of the ranch is very scenic.  West of the Pease the ranch has a moderate canopy of Mesquite with Juniper found in the rougher country.   Elevations on the ranch range from 1,800 to 2,300 feet. The Pease River bottom is wide and productive with sandy soils and sub-irrigated vegetation along the river channel.  Mesquite, Salt Cedar, Willows and Cottonwoods are all common in the river bottom.  East of the river, soils are sandy loam and loamy with Mesquite, Sage and Shin Oak. The property is fenced and cross-fenced into approximately 25 pastures and traps.  A small in-holding tract is located near the north center of the ranch.  Owners of this in-holding have historic access through the Matador to enter this in-holding tract.   The Tee Pee City/Lucky Knob Division is watered by the Pease River, dirt tanks, wells and waterlines with drinking troughs. Improvements include working pens, two sets of shipping pens and the ranch manager’s house with outbuildings. Summary With its long history and nearly 70-year current ownership of the Matador Ranch, this is a rare opportunity to purchase this fine working cattle ranch.  The property has been well improved, well managed and has the added benefit of great recreation and hunting opportunities. The Matador Ranch is very realistically priced at $950 per acre and one-half of the Seller’s mineral interest will convey. The offering of the Matador Ranch is an opportunity to own and enjoy one of the most historic ranches not only in Texas, but in the United States.
$124,450,000

Premier Listing

Champion Ranch
#TX380707
Leon, 
5,000.00 acres
Located halfway between Dallas and Houston, Champion Ranch boasts over 5,000 acres of prime ranch land. Atop oak tree studded sandy loam hills, the property includes an idyllic owners home on a private 78-acre lake. In addition, the ranch has numerous barns, eight guest and ranch houses, and a 16-person bunkhouse. With over 20 additional lakes, stock ponds and live river streams, Champion Ranch is also home to a sprawling peach orchid that currently produces 18 varieties of peaches. Dinner and dancing are conducted in the 2,200 sq. ft. on-property Saloon. With two bars, a piano and sound system, the Saloon seats up to 130 guests for corporate or private events. There are 36 oil and gas wells situated on the property. The underground mineral ownership rights, included in the deal, currently produce significant income as well as prospective future fortunes. Livestock include herds of purebred Brangus breeder cattle and award-winning horses. Ranch equipment and more are offered in the turn key sale. The Richard Wallrath Educational Foundation, established in 2006, is slated to receive the majority proceeds of the multi-million dollar ranch sale and distribute between the 4-H Youth Development Foundation and FFA, previously Texas Future Farmers of America. The sale includes 100% of all oil and gas well rights, existing and future royalty income streams, approximately 1,000 head of purebred cattle, and more. Champion Ranch Oil and Gas: - 100% of owned mineral rights and oil & gas income convey, no reservations. - 36 ranch wells - 16 producing wells. 12 horizontals / 4 verticals Champion Ranch Cattle: - Brangus Cow Calf Operation - Ranch Capacity: 1,200 Head during normal rainfall and temperate years Champion Ranch Water Sources: - 14 working water wells (not including oilfield) - 3 artesian wells - 1 78 acre lake, stocked with bass & catfish - 20+ smaller lakes & ponds throughout the ranch (most stocked with bass & catfish) Live Water: - Keechi Creek runs through the middle of the ranch (North to South) - Beaver Creek runs northern boundary of the ranch - A natural wetland is located on the NE corner of the ranch Champion Ranch Improvements: Main House - 3,992 sq. ft., Built 2002, 3 bed/2 bath - Car Port (960 sq. ft.) - Guest Quarters (660 sq. ft.) - Weight Room (600 sq. ft.) - Office/Museum (1,600 sq. ft.), Built 2014 - Swimming Pool Second Owners House (Yellow House) - 4,500 sq. ft., Built 2014, 4 bed / 3.5 bath Manager's House - 2,698 sq. ft., Built 1978 - Car Port (532 sq. ft.) - Metal Shop / Covered swimming pool (1,290 sq. ft.) - Bath house (744 sq. ft.) Camp House - 2,676 sq. ft., Built 2012, 2 bed/2 bath - This Bunkhouse/Guesthouse sleeps 16+ people with family room, kitchen, breakfast bar, dining area, utility room with washer, dryer, and storage, "unused" smoke house, picnic pavilion with BBQ pit, concrete sidewalks, and burn pit with overlooking view. Cattle Manager's house (White House) - 1,812 sq. ft., Built 1958, 4 bed/3 bath - Wood frame house with carport and several out buildings, paved driveway, fully fenced. 4 Ranch Houses - 1,400 sq. ft., Built 1994-2008, 3 bed/2.5 bath - Laundry room, office area, kitchen with breakfast bar, dining area, and family room. Ranch House - 1,400 sq. ft., Built 1984, 2 bed/2 bath - Remodeled, laundry room, kitchen, dining area, and family room. Ranch Buildings: Horse Barn and Stables - 11,800 sq. ft., Built 2008 - apartment living quarters and bath, 2 offices, tack room, bathroom, music control room, horse wash area, horse walker, round working pen, paved drive and parking. Covered Arena - 52,500 sq. ft., Built 2001 - grand stands, rodeo bucking chutes, pens, paved entry Sales Arena - 2,160 sq. ft., Built 2001 - Livestock auction style sale arena with theater type seating, ticket/bookkeeping office area. Pens connect with covered arena, paved drive entry, central air & heat. Saloon - 2,208 sq. ft., Built 2012 - 2 bathrooms, seats 130 people, dance floor, large bar and back bar, piano, bandstand, sound system for bands or public speaking, large covered porch with lounge chairs and tables, central air and heating, ceiling fans, fully furnished. Main Office - 2,400 sq. ft., Built 1992 - 2 bathrooms, conference room, 2 large offices, 2 smaller offices, reception desk and reception area with seating, fully furnished, central air and heat, internet and satellite services, electric entry gate, paved entry and parking, covered porch with rocking chairs. Covered Working Barn with Pens - 26,090 sq. ft., Built 1984 - Remodeled several times since it was built, bathroom, tack room, feed room, horse stalls, hydraulic working chutes and numerous sorting pens. Paved entry and parking, 18-wheeler and cattle trailer loading area, and numerous outside holding pens. Peach Barn - 6,250 sq. ft., Built 2012 - With apartment living quarters, 2 baths, 2 walk-in coolers, 4 large "roll-up" doors, covered parking, electric gate, white rock entry and parking, peach processing table for washing and sort Tractor Equipment Shed and Shop - 2,880 sq. ft., Built 1984 - Shop with tools for working on equipment, overhead fuel tanks, overhead bulk feed bins, pipe racks for pipe storage, paved entry and parking. Office Shop - 1,800 sq. ft., Built 1980's - Ranch maintenance storage area and shop for lawn mowers, carpentry tools, lumber, etc. Smoke House & Processing Facility - 500 sq. ft.
$0

Premier Listing

Big Wyoming Ranch
#WY342041
Weston, 
150,085.00 acres
The Big Wyoming Ranch is a combination of three large, low-overhead grass ranches, all of which are easily-accessible year-round via well-maintained graveled county roads. The ranch consists of 91,746+ deeded acres, 8,240± State of Wyoming lease acres, 33,560± Thunder Basin National Grassland permit acres, and 16,539± BLM lease acres for a total of 150,085+ acres. Historically, the Big Wyoming Ranch has been used as a year-round cow/calf operation and is owner-rated for an average of 3,660 pairs plus bulls and ranch horses. The ranch is well watered and consists of several solar wells, submersible wells, windmills, reservoirs and live water that provide ample water for livestock and wildlife. Grazing is maximized with cross-fencing and underground pipelines to provide stock water strategically throughout the ranch. Improvements include twelve houses, shops, storage buildings, barns, several additional livestock sheds and other outbuildings, and several sets of working corrals. The Big Wyoming Ranch a superb, low-overhead grass ranch with extensive variety of wildlife that includes mule deer, whitetail deer, antelope, elk, wild turkeys, and a several species of small game.
$50,369,000

Premier Listing

Swenson Family Flat Top Ranch - Stonewall
#TX245957
Stonewall, 
41,000.00 acres
This property has been recently reduced from $1200 per acre to $985. The Flat Top Division of the legendary Swenson Ranch was established in 1853 - 1854 and the ranch contains 41,000 +/- acres. Elevations on the ranch range from approximately 1,600' feet to around 1,750'. The terrain over the eastern portion of the Flat Top Ranch is described as nearly level to gently rolling and sloping towards several noticeable drainages, all draining to the northeast. A very prominent elevated mesa, known as Flat Top Mountain, is located on the west-half of the ranch. The elevation change from the country below the mesa top to the country on the upper edge of the mesa is approximately 100 feet. The east face of the mesa is steep and rocky, but much of the mesa top is level and gently sloping. Views from the mesa edge are very impressive. To the west of the large mesa top, the level country transitions to header draws, becoming deeper canyon drainages, all flowing to the northwest to the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River. Native grass cover is considered to be good to excellent over much of the property. Principal native grasses include several varieties of bluestem, side oats grama, Texas winter grass, Arizona cottontop, blue grama, buffalo grass, tobosa, vine-mesquite, western wheat grass and sand drop seed. With favorable winter moisture, wildrye and filaree are abundant over major portions of the ranch. Approximately 6,300 acres are in cultivation, scattered over about a dozen fields throughout the ranch. All of the cultivated land is farmed on a dryland basis, principally farmed in wheat for seasonal grazing of livestock. With large areas of the ranch having very productive soils, it is estimated that an additional 10,000 acres could be broken out and farmed, if desired. With normal precipitation, this area of Texas is considered desirable wheat pasture country. LOCATION The ranch is generally located immediately west of Stamford, Texas, but two small non-contiguous tracts are located north and east of Stamford. Access to all major portions of the ranch are by paved highways and county roads. The ranch has an extensive network of well-maintained private ranch roads, making the property very accessible overall. Abilene, Texas is approximately 40 miles south of the ranch, with Fort Worth being approximately 180 miles to the east and Lubbock being approximately 140 miles to the northwest. The ranch is located on the Texas Rolling Plains, which is an area widely recognized for ranching, farming, mineral production, and in more recent years, outstanding hunting. HISTORY The historic Swenson Ranches trace their origin to Svante Magnus Swenson, the first Swedish immigrant to arrive in Texas, landing near what is now Galveston in 1838. The famous SMS brand, with two backward S’s was one of the first registered in Texas and was derived from Swenson’s initials. Swenson, a close ally of Sam Houston, played an active role in the state’s early history. He served as Travis County Commissioner in the 1850’s and as the first Treasurer of the State Agriculture Society. Swenson opened one of the first stores in Austin, introduced the Colt revolver to the frontier, and established the Swedish Pipeline which brought thousands of Swedish families to settle in Texas after the Civil War. A cabin from Swenson’s farm east of Austin, called Govalle, is enshrined today at Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin as part of the Swedish Pioneer Village. By 1850 Svante had established himself in the general merchandise business in Austin. His large frontier trading post traded saddles, boots, blankets and many other supplies. Through his trading, Swenson began acquiring substantial amounts of land. Swenson also invested in railroad bonds and school bonds which entitled him to even more acreage. By 1860 Swenson had accumulated over 680,000 acres in Texas, much of it the unsettled territories on North Texas, north of Abilene. It was from these lands that the Flat Top Ranch was organized and is still owned by S.M. Swenson’s direct descendants. Because he was an ally of Houston’s and a vocal opponent of secession from the Union, Swenson was nearly assassinated at the beginning of the Civil War. With continuing threats on his life, he fled to Mexico in 1863 hidden under straw in a covered wagon. After the Civil War he settled in New York City where his wife and children joined him. He sold off his holdings around Austin, but maintained ownership of the land in the northern parts of Texas. In 1882 these lands were fenced and organized by Swenson’s sons, Eric and Swen Albin, and the vast ranching operations began. Initially the sons leased the ranches from their father and when Svante died in 1896, they inherited the properties. At this time there were three ranches: Ericsdahl, Eleonora and Mount Albin. The Ericsdahl Ranch which was located 7 miles east of Stamford was split up and sold to Swedish immigrants in the early 1900’s. Eleonora became known as the Throckmorton Ranch because it was in that county. The Mount Albin Ranch became known as the Flat Top Ranch because of a prominent mesa on the property. This is the ranch that Chas. S. Middleton and Son, LLC, has for sale today. The Swenson brothers hired one of S.M. Swenson’s nephews as the first manager of the overall operations. He was responsible for stocking the ranches and overseeing the construction of the headquarters, barns, and corrals, as well as the drilling of water wells. The first herds were comprised of 1,800 high-grade Durham Shorthorns and 180 Hereford-Shorthorn crosses along with registered Hereford bulls. The original remuda was driven up the Chisolm Trail from Round Rock, Texas where many Swedes had settled. The horses were a mix of Spanish and Arabian stock. The first ranch hands were mostly Swedish immigrants who had settled first in towns around Austin, like Round Rock, New Sweden and Elgin and many others came directly from Sweden. The ranches continued to grow as the family purchased the Scab 8 Ranch in 1900, adding another 79,000 acres of land to their holdings and renamed it the Tongue River Ranch. In 1906 they purchased the Espuela Ranch with other partners which gave them access to over 200,000 acres more. This ranch became the Spur Ranch and while much of it was sold off in the 1920’s, the family still owned 65,000 acres of it until the 1970’s. In order to make it easier to get their cattle to market, the Swenson brothers convinced the Texas Central Railroad to extend its rail line from Albany, Texas, 38 miles to the east, to the place that is now Stamford, Texas. The family donated the initial 640 acres from the Flat Top Ranch for the town and helped lay it out. The present headquarters for the Swenson Land & Cattle Co, was built in the town, on Swenson Street, in the 1920’s. Some of the property that is part of the Flat Top Ranch remains inside or adjacent to the town limits, including a recent purchase of about 132 acres that contains substantial cattle pens for feeding, weaning, etc. The Texas Cowboy Reunion Rodeo grounds, still the largest working cowboy rodeo in the US, was founded in Stamford by the Swenson heirs in 1930 on land that they also donated from their Flat Top holdings. In 1902 the Swenson brothers hired Frank S. Hastings as manager of their far-flung ranches and over the next two decades committed to the breeding and improvement of the SMS cattle. Under Hastings’ supervision, SMS became among the first ranches to participate in the “mail order” calf business. The cattle won many awards and developed a reputation for quality that remains today. Eric Swenson, Svante’s oldest son, remained as president of the ranches until his death in 1945. He was succeeded by one of his sons, Swen R. Swenson. In 1978 the holdings totaling over 250,000 acres were divided among four family groups. Three of the groups have since sold their ranches. The remaining group, whose land includes the Flat Top Ranch, was headed by Bruce B Swenson, one of Swen R. Swenson’s sons, and included Bruce’s brothers, Rod and Perry Swenson. The three brothers have passed away and the company that owns the Flat Top Ranch is now the Swenson Land & Cattle Co. and is chaired by Steve Swenson, one of Bruce’s sons. All the board of directors and shareholders are descendants of Svante Magnus Swenson. In recent years Swenson Land & Cattle has continued as a strong cow/calf operator and almost always gets the highest price for its class of cattle at Superior Livestock Auctions and other venues. Cattle buyers for Whole Foods have purchased the ranch’s cattle over the last 5-6 years. As a result, the Global Animal Partnership (GAP), Whole Food’s third party certification partner, has made on-site inspections of the ranch’s operations twice in the last 5 years. The ranch received a GAP 4 rating indicating it uses best practices for humane treatment of its cattle for an operation of this size. The ranch hands, now headed by Mark Voss, have won several ranch rodeo competitions over the past several years in places like Wichita Falls and Abilene. Wildlife is abundant at Flat Top and hunting leases have contributed substantial revenue in the past 10 years or so. The company sells a small amount of cattle to Svante’s Ranch Direct, a company owned by several S.M. Swenson descendants. They sell grass finished beef through farmers markets, a web site and food truck in the Austin area. As the years have gone by and the family tree continues to grow, shareholders have become more and more dispersed throughout the US and their interests have become more diverse. With many shareholders now in their mid-to late 60’s, the board reluctantly voted to sell Flat Top in order to provide some liquidity to those who wanted some. Selling Flat Top was not an easy decision for the family especially knowing that this heritage that traces directly to S.M. Swenson would pass from his great great-grandchildren and future descendants. However, the family has concluded that this the right time in their lives to do this. Sources: Clark, Mary Whatley - The Swenson Saga and the SMS Ranches (Austin, Texas: Jenkins Book Publishing Co. 1976); Baize, Wayne – Swenson Land & Cattle Company (2014); Anderson, H. Allen - SMS Ranches (Texas State Historical Association) WATER FEATURES The Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River flows in a northeasterly direction through the ranch for approximately seven miles. Large tree cover is common along the river bottom with cedar found along the ridgelines and canyon side slopes. This area of the ranch is considered very scenic and offers great recreational appeal. Additionally, there are a number of smaller seasonal creeks throughout the property. The ranch is well watered by over 40 water wells, being a combination of windmills and electric submersible wells. These water sources distribute water to an extensive network of approximately 25 miles of waterlines and over 100 drinking troughs. Other water sources include approximately 140 earthen ponds, some of which are seasonal, with others being very large and considered to be a desirable year-round source of livestock water. Overall, the ranch is considered to be well watered. LIVESTOCK/CATTLE OPERATIONS Historically, the Flat Top Division of the Swenson Ranch has been operated as a cow/calf operation. Depending on weather conditions, the ranch is typically stocked with 850 – 1,000 mother cows, plus bulls and replacements. The ranch maintains a quality cow herd and while the cattle are not included in the sale, they are available to be purchased at market price. Current livestock inventory is approximately 855 bred cows, 90 bred heifers and 70 bulls. HUNTING, WILDLIFE AND RECREATION The Flat Top Division offers great hunting opportunities, including white tail deer, quail, dove, feral hogs and seasonal water fowl. Fishing is available in the river and several of the larger ponds. IMPROVEMENTS The ranch owns a small grow yard located just west of Stamford. The pens are of pipe construction with complete working facilities, scales and some covered pens. This tract has some adjoining pasture and farmland, which compliments the grow yard. The property is adequately improved for the day to day ranching operation. In addition to the grow yard, other structural improvements include the main headquarters, the Taylor Camp, the Farm Center, and approximately 17 sets of livestock shipping/working/branding pens. The headquarter improvements consist of the ranch manager’s home, several employee houses, barns, horse stalls and a large set of livestock shipping pens, which are equipped with scales. The Taylor Camp is improved with a camp manager’s home, bunk house and shipping pens equipped with scales. The Farm Center improvements include a metal barn/shop with a fenced area for housing farm equipment and fuel. The Flat Top Division of the Swenson Ranch is fenced and cross fenced into many multiple pastures, and most all of the fences are considered to be in average to above average condition. Totally, there are approximately 166 miles of fencing on the ranch. RESOURCES There is scattered oil production on the ranch. The original oil production was first discovered in the early 1950’s and some of this original production is still producing. In 1978, as briefly mentioned in the History of the Swenson Ranches, the four Swenson Families agreed to partition all of the ranches into four separate family divisions. After the ranches were partitioned, the three other families began selling off their divisions. At the time of this partition, each division of the Swenson Ranches had all or most all of the minerals intact. Each of the four families received one-quarter of the minerals under each of the four divisions. That being the case, the Swenson Family members owning the Flat Top Division have approximately 25% of the minerals under this ranch. Current royalty income is fairly substantial. New drilling is now underway, and recent development would suggest the possibility of a substantial new income source from oil. Since it is very difficult to determine the present value and future potential of the minerals, the family has elected to negotiate on the mineral conveyance based on the final offering price for the property. Based on the family owning approximately 25% of the minerals under the Flat Top Division, current royalty income is approximately $200,000 per year on the original production and approximately $600,000 per year on the newly discovered production. In addition to the income derived from the cattle operation and farming income, other sources of income include hunting lease revenue, periodic surface damage income and income derived from oil and gas leases and oil and gas royalty production. The hunting is leased on a year to year basis and can be extended if a buyer is not interested in hunting, or terminated, if the buyer wants possession of the hunting. The ranch just negotiated a gas pipeline easement crossing approximately 7 miles of the ranch. This pipeline has just been installed and the utility company has re-seeded this easement with grass. The ranch collected $1,300,000 for this easement. While there are no major electric transmission lines currently located on the ranch, many large wind farm developments and transmission lines are located throughout this region of Texas. With this in mind, the owners of the Flat Top Division propose to reserve 25% of any future wind energy royalty income, but the purchaser of the ranch will have full control of negotiating any future wind energy leases. PRICE AND REMARKS The Flat Top Division of the Swenson Ranch is very reasonably priced at $985 per acre. It is very seldom that a ranch of this magnitude and history becomes available in this area of Texas. The owners of the ranch are currently in the process of surveying the entire property in order to establish the exact acres of the ranch. This survey is being paid for by the owners. Property taxes are approximately $63,000 per year or about $1.50 per acre. BROKER COMMENTS The ranch is generally operated with approximately eight full-time employees. In addition to the very knowledgeable ranch manager, there is clerical help at the office in Stamford along with additional farm/ranch employees, including the Taylor Camp manager. All together this efficient staff keeps the books, pays bills, manages the day to day farming and ranching operation, maintains the property and meets with the family on a regular basis. As the broker selected to market this property, it is apparent the current employees are a valuable asset to the ranch and a buyer of this property should strongly consider keeping everyone on board. All employees are anxious to remain with the ranch. This long-term ownership ranch has not been offered for sale throughout the 165-year history of the property. This first time offering of the Swenson Flat Top Ranch is an historic opportunity to own a quality working cattle ranch, which includes an extensive farming operation that can be expanded, if desired. In addition to farming and ranching, the property offers excellent hunting opportunities, potential future wind farm development, periodic surface damage income, and the potential to share in some portion of the mineral income.
$40,385,000

Premier Listing

Swenson Family Flat Top Ranch - Jones
#TX245958
Jones, 
41,000.00 acres
This property has been recently reduced from $1200 per acre to $985. The Flat Top Division of the legendary Swenson Ranch was established in 1853 - 1854 and the ranch contains 41,000 +/- acres. Elevations on the ranch range from approximately 1,600' feet to around 1,750'. The terrain over the eastern portion of the Flat Top Ranch is described as nearly level to gently rolling and sloping towards several noticeable drainages, all draining to the northeast. A very prominent elevated mesa, known as Flat Top Mountain, is located on the west-half of the ranch. The elevation change from the country below the mesa top to the country on the upper edge of the mesa is approximately 100 feet. The east face of the mesa is steep and rocky, but much of the mesa top is level and gently sloping. Views from the mesa edge are very impressive. To the west of the large mesa top, the level country transitions to header draws, becoming deeper canyon drainages, all flowing to the northwest to the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River. Native grass cover is considered to be good to excellent over much of the property. Principal native grasses include several varieties of bluestem, side oats grama, Texas winter grass, Arizona cottontop, blue grama, buffalo grass, tobosa, vine-mesquite, western wheat grass and sand drop seed. With favorable winter moisture, wildrye and filaree are abundant over major portions of the ranch. Approximately 6,300 acres are in cultivation, scattered over about a dozen fields throughout the ranch. All of the cultivated land is farmed on a dryland basis, principally farmed in wheat for seasonal grazing of livestock. With large areas of the ranch having very productive soils, it is estimated that an additional 10,000 acres could be broken out and farmed, if desired. With normal precipitation, this area of Texas is considered desirable wheat pasture country. LOCATION The ranch is generally located immediately west of Stamford, Texas, but two small non-contiguous tracts are located north and east of Stamford. Access to all major portions of the ranch are by paved highways and county roads. The ranch has an extensive network of well-maintained private ranch roads, making the property very accessible overall. Abilene, Texas is approximately 40 miles south of the ranch, with Fort Worth being approximately 180 miles to the east and Lubbock being approximately 140 miles to the northwest. The ranch is located on the Texas Rolling Plains, which is an area widely recognized for ranching, farming, mineral production, and in more recent years, outstanding hunting. HISTORY The historic Swenson Ranches trace their origin to Svante Magnus Swenson, the first Swedish immigrant to arrive in Texas, landing near what is now Galveston in 1838. The famous SMS brand, with two backward S’s was one of the first registered in Texas and was derived from Swenson’s initials. Swenson, a close ally of Sam Houston, played an active role in the state’s early history. He served as Travis County Commissioner in the 1850’s and as the first Treasurer of the State Agriculture Society. Swenson opened one of the first stores in Austin, introduced the Colt revolver to the frontier, and established the Swedish Pipeline which brought thousands of Swedish families to settle in Texas after the Civil War. A cabin from Swenson’s farm east of Austin, called Govalle, is enshrined today at Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin as part of the Swedish Pioneer Village. By 1850 Svante had established himself in the general merchandise business in Austin. His large frontier trading post traded saddles, boots, blankets and many other supplies. Through his trading, Swenson began acquiring substantial amounts of land. Swenson also invested in railroad bonds and school bonds which entitled him to even more acreage. By 1860 Swenson had accumulated over 680,000 acres in Texas, much of it the unsettled territories on North Texas, north of Abilene. It was from these lands that the Flat Top Ranch was organized and is still owned by S.M. Swenson’s direct descendants. Because he was an ally of Houston’s and a vocal opponent of secession from the Union, Swenson was nearly assassinated at the beginning of the Civil War. With continuing threats on his life, he fled to Mexico in 1863 hidden under straw in a covered wagon. After the Civil War he settled in New York City where his wife and children joined him. He sold off his holdings around Austin, but maintained ownership of the land in the northern parts of Texas. In 1882 these lands were fenced and organized by Swenson’s sons, Eric and Swen Albin, and the vast ranching operations began. Initially the sons leased the ranches from their father and when Svante died in 1896, they inherited the properties. At this time there were three ranches: Ericsdahl, Eleonora and Mount Albin. The Ericsdahl Ranch which was located 7 miles east of Stamford was split up and sold to Swedish immigrants in the early 1900’s. Eleonora became known as the Throckmorton Ranch because it was in that county. The Mount Albin Ranch became known as the Flat Top Ranch because of a prominent mesa on the property. This is the ranch that Chas. S. Middleton and Son, LLC, has for sale today. The Swenson brothers hired one of S.M. Swenson’s nephews as the first manager of the overall operations. He was responsible for stocking the ranches and overseeing the construction of the headquarters, barns, and corrals, as well as the drilling of water wells. The first herds were comprised of 1,800 high-grade Durham Shorthorns and 180 Hereford-Shorthorn crosses along with registered Hereford bulls. The original remuda was driven up the Chisolm Trail from Round Rock, Texas where many Swedes had settled. The horses were a mix of Spanish and Arabian stock. The first ranch hands were mostly Swedish immigrants who had settled first in towns around Austin, like Round Rock, New Sweden and Elgin and many others came directly from Sweden. The ranches continued to grow as the family purchased the Scab 8 Ranch in 1900, adding another 79,000 acres of land to their holdings and renamed it the Tongue River Ranch. In 1906 they purchased the Espuela Ranch with other partners which gave them access to over 200,000 acres more. This ranch became the Spur Ranch and while much of it was sold off in the 1920’s, the family still owned 65,000 acres of it until the 1970’s. In order to make it easier to get their cattle to market, the Swenson brothers convinced the Texas Central Railroad to extend its rail line from Albany, Texas, 38 miles to the east, to the place that is now Stamford, Texas. The family donated the initial 640 acres from the Flat Top Ranch for the town and helped lay it out. The present headquarters for the Swenson Land & Cattle Co, was built in the town, on Swenson Street, in the 1920’s. Some of the property that is part of the Flat Top Ranch remains inside or adjacent to the town limits, including a recent purchase of about 132 acres that contains substantial cattle pens for feeding, weaning, etc. The Texas Cowboy Reunion Rodeo grounds, still the largest working cowboy rodeo in the US, was founded in Stamford by the Swenson heirs in 1930 on land that they also donated from their Flat Top holdings. In 1902 the Swenson brothers hired Frank S. Hastings as manager of their far-flung ranches and over the next two decades committed to the breeding and improvement of the SMS cattle. Under Hastings’ supervision, SMS became among the first ranches to participate in the “mail order” calf business. The cattle won many awards and developed a reputation for quality that remains today. Eric Swenson, Svante’s oldest son, remained as president of the ranches until his death in 1945. He was succeeded by one of his sons, Swen R. Swenson. In 1978 the holdings totaling over 250,000 acres were divided among four family groups. Three of the groups have since sold their ranches. The remaining group, whose land includes the Flat Top Ranch, was headed by Bruce B Swenson, one of Swen R. Swenson’s sons, and included Bruce’s brothers, Rod and Perry Swenson. The three brothers have passed away and the company that owns the Flat Top Ranch is now the Swenson Land & Cattle Co. and is chaired by Steve Swenson, one of Bruce’s sons. All the board of directors and shareholders are descendants of Svante Magnus Swenson. In recent years Swenson Land & Cattle has continued as a strong cow/calf operator and almost always gets the highest price for its class of cattle at Superior Livestock Auctions and other venues. Cattle buyers for Whole Foods have purchased the ranch’s cattle over the last 5-6 years. As a result, the Global Animal Partnership (GAP), Whole Food’s third party certification partner, has made on-site inspections of the ranch’s operations twice in the last 5 years. The ranch received a GAP 4 rating indicating it uses best practices for humane treatment of its cattle for an operation of this size. The ranch hands, now headed by Mark Voss, have won several ranch rodeo competitions over the past several years in places like Wichita Falls and Abilene. Wildlife is abundant at Flat Top and hunting leases have contributed substantial revenue in the past 10 years or so. The company sells a small amount of cattle to Svante’s Ranch Direct, a company owned by several S.M. Swenson descendants. They sell grass finished beef through farmers markets, a web site and food truck in the Austin area. As the years have gone by and the family tree continues to grow, shareholders have become more and more dispersed throughout the US and their interests have become more diverse. With many shareholders now in their mid-to late 60’s, the board reluctantly voted to sell Flat Top in order to provide some liquidity to those who wanted some. Selling Flat Top was not an easy decision for the family especially knowing that this heritage that traces directly to S.M. Swenson would pass from his great great-grandchildren and future descendants. However, the family has concluded that this the right time in their lives to do this. Sources: Clark, Mary Whatley - The Swenson Saga and the SMS Ranches (Austin, Texas: Jenkins Book Publishing Co. 1976); Baize, Wayne – Swenson Land & Cattle Company (2014); Anderson, H. Allen - SMS Ranches (Texas State Historical Association) WATER FEATURES The Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River flows in a northeasterly direction through the ranch for approximately seven miles. Large tree cover is common along the river bottom with cedar found along the ridgelines and canyon side slopes. This area of the ranch is considered very scenic and offers great recreational appeal. Additionally, there are a number of smaller seasonal creeks throughout the property. The ranch is well watered by over 40 water wells, being a combination of windmills and electric submersible wells. These water sources distribute water to an extensive network of approximately 25 miles of waterlines and over 100 drinking troughs. Other water sources include approximately 140 earthen ponds, some of which are seasonal, with others being very large and considered to be a desirable year-round source of livestock water. Overall, the ranch is considered to be well watered. LIVESTOCK/CATTLE OPERATIONS Historically, the Flat Top Division of the Swenson Ranch has been operated as a cow/calf operation. Depending on weather conditions, the ranch is typically stocked with 850 – 1,000 mother cows, plus bulls and replacements. The ranch maintains a quality cow herd and while the cattle are not included in the sale, they are available to be purchased at market price. Current livestock inventory is approximately 855 bred cows, 90 bred heifers and 70 bulls. HUNTING, WILDLIFE AND RECREATION The Flat Top Division offers great hunting opportunities, including white tail deer, quail, dove, feral hogs and seasonal water fowl. Fishing is available in the river and several of the larger ponds. IMPROVEMENTS The ranch owns a small grow yard located just west of Stamford. The pens are of pipe construction with complete working facilities, scales and some covered pens. This tract has some adjoining pasture and farmland, which compliments the grow yard. The property is adequately improved for the day to day ranching operation. In addition to the grow yard, other structural improvements include the main headquarters, the Taylor Camp, the Farm Center, and approximately 17 sets of livestock shipping/working/branding pens. The headquarter improvements consist of the ranch manager’s home, several employee houses, barns, horse stalls and a large set of livestock shipping pens, which are equipped with scales. The Taylor Camp is improved with a camp manager’s home, bunk house and shipping pens equipped with scales. The Farm Center improvements include a metal barn/shop with a fenced area for housing farm equipment and fuel. The Flat Top Division of the Swenson Ranch is fenced and cross fenced into many multiple pastures, and most all of the fences are considered to be in average to above average condition. Totally, there are approximately 166 miles of fencing on the ranch. RESOURCES There is scattered oil production on the ranch. The original oil production was first discovered in the early 1950’s and some of this original production is still producing. In 1978, as briefly mentioned in the History of the Swenson Ranches, the four Swenson Families agreed to partition all of the ranches into four separate family divisions. After the ranches were partitioned, the three other families began selling off their divisions. At the time of this partition, each division of the Swenson Ranches had all or most all of the minerals intact. Each of the four families received one-quarter of the minerals under each of the four divisions. That being the case, the Swenson Family members owning the Flat Top Division have approximately 25% of the minerals under this ranch. Current royalty income is fairly substantial. New drilling is now underway, and recent development would suggest the possibility of a substantial new income source from oil. Since it is very difficult to determine the present value and future potential of the minerals, the family has elected to negotiate on the mineral conveyance based on the final offering price for the property. Based on the family owning approximately 25% of the minerals under the Flat Top Division, current royalty income is approximately $200,000 per year on the original production and approximately $600,000 per year on the newly discovered production. In addition to the income derived from the cattle operation and farming income, other sources of income include hunting lease revenue, periodic surface damage income and income derived from oil and gas leases and oil and gas royalty production. The hunting is leased on a year to year basis and can be extended if a buyer is not interested in hunting, or terminated, if the buyer wants possession of the hunting. The ranch just negotiated a gas pipeline easement crossing approximately 7 miles of the ranch. This pipeline has just been installed and the utility company has re-seeded this easement with grass. The ranch collected $1,300,000 for this easement. While there are no major electric transmission lines currently located on the ranch, many large wind farm developments and transmission lines are located throughout this region of Texas. With this in mind, the owners of the Flat Top Division propose to reserve 25% of any future wind energy royalty income, but the purchaser of the ranch will have full control of negotiating any future wind energy leases. PRICE AND REMARKS The Flat Top Division of the Swenson Ranch is very reasonably priced at $985 per acre. It is very seldom that a ranch of this magnitude and history becomes available in this area of Texas. The owners of the ranch are currently in the process of surveying the entire property in order to establish the exact acres of the ranch. This survey is being paid for by the owners. Property taxes are approximately $63,000 per year or about $1.50 per acre. BROKER COMMENTS The ranch is generally operated with approximately eight full-time employees. In addition to the very knowledgeable ranch manager, there is clerical help at the office in Stamford along with additional farm/ranch employees, including the Taylor Camp manager. All together this efficient staff keeps the books, pays bills, manages the day to day farming and ranching operation, maintains the property and meets with the family on a regular basis. As the broker selected to market this property, it is apparent the current employees are a valuable asset to the ranch and a buyer of this property should strongly consider keeping everyone on board. All employees are anxious to remain with the ranch. This long-term ownership ranch has not been offered for sale throughout the 165-year history of the property. This first time offering of the Swenson Flat Top Ranch is an historic opportunity to own a quality working cattle ranch, which includes an extensive farming operation that can be expanded, if desired. In addition to farming and ranching, the property offers excellent hunting opportunities, potential future wind farm development, periodic surface damage income, and the potential to share in some portion of the mineral income.
$40,385,000

Premier Listing

Swenson Family Flat Top Ranch - Haskell
#TX245959
Haskell, 
41,000.00 acres
This property has been recently reduced from $1200 per acre to $985. The Flat Top Division of the legendary Swenson Ranch was established in 1853 - 1854 and the ranch contains 41,000 +/- acres. Elevations on the ranch range from approximately 1,600' feet to around 1,750'. The terrain over the eastern portion of the Flat Top Ranch is described as nearly level to gently rolling and sloping towards several noticeable drainages, all draining to the northeast. A very prominent elevated mesa, known as Flat Top Mountain, is located on the west-half of the ranch. The elevation change from the country below the mesa top to the country on the upper edge of the mesa is approximately 100 feet. The east face of the mesa is steep and rocky, but much of the mesa top is level and gently sloping. Views from the mesa edge are very impressive. To the west of the large mesa top, the level country transitions to header draws, becoming deeper canyon drainages, all flowing to the northwest to the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River. Native grass cover is considered to be good to excellent over much of the property. Principal native grasses include several varieties of bluestem, side oats grama, Texas winter grass, Arizona cottontop, blue grama, buffalo grass, tobosa, vine-mesquite, western wheat grass and sand drop seed. With favorable winter moisture, wildrye and filaree are abundant over major portions of the ranch. Approximately 6,300 acres are in cultivation, scattered over about a dozen fields throughout the ranch. All of the cultivated land is farmed on a dryland basis, principally farmed in wheat for seasonal grazing of livestock. With large areas of the ranch having very productive soils, it is estimated that an additional 10,000 acres could be broken out and farmed, if desired. With normal precipitation, this area of Texas is considered desirable wheat pasture country. LOCATION The ranch is generally located immediately west of Stamford, Texas, but two small non-contiguous tracts are located north and east of Stamford. Access to all major portions of the ranch are by paved highways and county roads. The ranch has an extensive network of well-maintained private ranch roads, making the property very accessible overall. Abilene, Texas is approximately 40 miles south of the ranch, with Fort Worth being approximately 180 miles to the east and Lubbock being approximately 140 miles to the northwest. The ranch is located on the Texas Rolling Plains, which is an area widely recognized for ranching, farming, mineral production, and in more recent years, outstanding hunting. HISTORY The historic Swenson Ranches trace their origin to Svante Magnus Swenson, the first Swedish immigrant to arrive in Texas, landing near what is now Galveston in 1838. The famous SMS brand, with two backward S’s was one of the first registered in Texas and was derived from Swenson’s initials. Swenson, a close ally of Sam Houston, played an active role in the state’s early history. He served as Travis County Commissioner in the 1850’s and as the first Treasurer of the State Agriculture Society. Swenson opened one of the first stores in Austin, introduced the Colt revolver to the frontier, and established the Swedish Pipeline which brought thousands of Swedish families to settle in Texas after the Civil War. A cabin from Swenson’s farm east of Austin, called Govalle, is enshrined today at Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin as part of the Swedish Pioneer Village. By 1850 Svante had established himself in the general merchandise business in Austin. His large frontier trading post traded saddles, boots, blankets and many other supplies. Through his trading, Swenson began acquiring substantial amounts of land. Swenson also invested in railroad bonds and school bonds which entitled him to even more acreage. By 1860 Swenson had accumulated over 680,000 acres in Texas, much of it the unsettled territories on North Texas, north of Abilene. It was from these lands that the Flat Top Ranch was organized and is still owned by S.M. Swenson’s direct descendants. Because he was an ally of Houston’s and a vocal opponent of secession from the Union, Swenson was nearly assassinated at the beginning of the Civil War. With continuing threats on his life, he fled to Mexico in 1863 hidden under straw in a covered wagon. After the Civil War he settled in New York City where his wife and children joined him. He sold off his holdings around Austin, but maintained ownership of the land in the northern parts of Texas. In 1882 these lands were fenced and organized by Swenson’s sons, Eric and Swen Albin, and the vast ranching operations began. Initially the sons leased the ranches from their father and when Svante died in 1896, they inherited the properties. At this time there were three ranches: Ericsdahl, Eleonora and Mount Albin. The Ericsdahl Ranch which was located 7 miles east of Stamford was split up and sold to Swedish immigrants in the early 1900’s. Eleonora became known as the Throckmorton Ranch because it was in that county. The Mount Albin Ranch became known as the Flat Top Ranch because of a prominent mesa on the property. This is the ranch that Chas. S. Middleton and Son, LLC, has for sale today. The Swenson brothers hired one of S.M. Swenson’s nephews as the first manager of the overall operations. He was responsible for stocking the ranches and overseeing the construction of the headquarters, barns, and corrals, as well as the drilling of water wells. The first herds were comprised of 1,800 high-grade Durham Shorthorns and 180 Hereford-Shorthorn crosses along with registered Hereford bulls. The original remuda was driven up the Chisolm Trail from Round Rock, Texas where many Swedes had settled. The horses were a mix of Spanish and Arabian stock. The first ranch hands were mostly Swedish immigrants who had settled first in towns around Austin, like Round Rock, New Sweden and Elgin and many others came directly from Sweden. The ranches continued to grow as the family purchased the Scab 8 Ranch in 1900, adding another 79,000 acres of land to their holdings and renamed it the Tongue River Ranch. In 1906 they purchased the Espuela Ranch with other partners which gave them access to over 200,000 acres more. This ranch became the Spur Ranch and while much of it was sold off in the 1920’s, the family still owned 65,000 acres of it until the 1970’s. In order to make it easier to get their cattle to market, the Swenson brothers convinced the Texas Central Railroad to extend its rail line from Albany, Texas, 38 miles to the east, to the place that is now Stamford, Texas. The family donated the initial 640 acres from the Flat Top Ranch for the town and helped lay it out. The present headquarters for the Swenson Land & Cattle Co, was built in the town, on Swenson Street, in the 1920’s. Some of the property that is part of the Flat Top Ranch remains inside or adjacent to the town limits, including a recent purchase of about 132 acres that contains substantial cattle pens for feeding, weaning, etc. The Texas Cowboy Reunion Rodeo grounds, still the largest working cowboy rodeo in the US, was founded in Stamford by the Swenson heirs in 1930 on land that they also donated from their Flat Top holdings. In 1902 the Swenson brothers hired Frank S. Hastings as manager of their far-flung ranches and over the next two decades committed to the breeding and improvement of the SMS cattle. Under Hastings’ supervision, SMS became among the first ranches to participate in the “mail order” calf business. The cattle won many awards and developed a reputation for quality that remains today. Eric Swenson, Svante’s oldest son, remained as president of the ranches until his death in 1945. He was succeeded by one of his sons, Swen R. Swenson. In 1978 the holdings totaling over 250,000 acres were divided among four family groups. Three of the groups have since sold their ranches. The remaining group, whose land includes the Flat Top Ranch, was headed by Bruce B Swenson, one of Swen R. Swenson’s sons, and included Bruce’s brothers, Rod and Perry Swenson. The three brothers have passed away and the company that owns the Flat Top Ranch is now the Swenson Land & Cattle Co. and is chaired by Steve Swenson, one of Bruce’s sons. All the board of directors and shareholders are descendants of Svante Magnus Swenson. In recent years Swenson Land & Cattle has continued as a strong cow/calf operator and almost always gets the highest price for its class of cattle at Superior Livestock Auctions and other venues. Cattle buyers for Whole Foods have purchased the ranch’s cattle over the last 5-6 years. As a result, the Global Animal Partnership (GAP), Whole Food’s third party certification partner, has made on-site inspections of the ranch’s operations twice in the last 5 years. The ranch received a GAP 4 rating indicating it uses best practices for humane treatment of its cattle for an operation of this size. The ranch hands, now headed by Mark Voss, have won several ranch rodeo competitions over the past several years in places like Wichita Falls and Abilene. Wildlife is abundant at Flat Top and hunting leases have contributed substantial revenue in the past 10 years or so. The company sells a small amount of cattle to Svante’s Ranch Direct, a company owned by several S.M. Swenson descendants. They sell grass finished beef through farmers markets, a web site and food truck in the Austin area. As the years have gone by and the family tree continues to grow, shareholders have become more and more dispersed throughout the US and their interests have become more diverse. With many shareholders now in their mid-to late 60’s, the board reluctantly voted to sell Flat Top in order to provide some liquidity to those who wanted some. Selling Flat Top was not an easy decision for the family especially knowing that this heritage that traces directly to S.M. Swenson would pass from his great great-grandchildren and future descendants. However, the family has concluded that this the right time in their lives to do this. Sources: Clark, Mary Whatley - The Swenson Saga and the SMS Ranches (Austin, Texas: Jenkins Book Publishing Co. 1976); Baize, Wayne – Swenson Land & Cattle Company (2014); Anderson, H. Allen - SMS Ranches (Texas State Historical Association) WATER FEATURES The Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River flows in a northeasterly direction through the ranch for approximately seven miles. Large tree cover is common along the river bottom with cedar found along the ridgelines and canyon side slopes. This area of the ranch is considered very scenic and offers great recreational appeal. Additionally, there are a number of smaller seasonal creeks throughout the property. The ranch is well watered by over 40 water wells, being a combination of windmills and electric submersible wells. These water sources distribute water to an extensive network of approximately 25 miles of waterlines and over 100 drinking troughs. Other water sources include approximately 140 earthen ponds, some of which are seasonal, with others being very large and considered to be a desirable year-round source of livestock water. Overall, the ranch is considered to be well watered. LIVESTOCK/CATTLE OPERATIONS Historically, the Flat Top Division of the Swenson Ranch has been operated as a cow/calf operation. Depending on weather conditions, the ranch is typically stocked with 850 – 1,000 mother cows, plus bulls and replacements. The ranch maintains a quality cow herd and while the cattle are not included in the sale, they are available to be purchased at market price. Current livestock inventory is approximately 855 bred cows, 90 bred heifers and 70 bulls. HUNTING, WILDLIFE AND RECREATION The Flat Top Division offers great hunting opportunities, including white tail deer, quail, dove, feral hogs and seasonal water fowl. Fishing is available in the river and several of the larger ponds. IMPROVEMENTS The ranch owns a small grow yard located just west of Stamford. The pens are of pipe construction with complete working facilities, scales and some covered pens. This tract has some adjoining pasture and farmland, which compliments the grow yard. The property is adequately improved for the day to day ranching operation. In addition to the grow yard, other structural improvements include the main headquarters, the Taylor Camp, the Farm Center, and approximately 17 sets of livestock shipping/working/branding pens. The headquarter improvements consist of the ranch manager’s home, several employee houses, barns, horse stalls and a large set of livestock shipping pens, which are equipped with scales. The Taylor Camp is improved with a camp manager’s home, bunk house and shipping pens equipped with scales. The Farm Center improvements include a metal barn/shop with a fenced area for housing farm equipment and fuel. The Flat Top Division of the Swenson Ranch is fenced and cross fenced into many multiple pastures, and most all of the fences are considered to be in average to above average condition. Totally, there are approximately 166 miles of fencing on the ranch. RESOURCES There is scattered oil production on the ranch. The original oil production was first discovered in the early 1950’s and some of this original production is still producing. In 1978, as briefly mentioned in the History of the Swenson Ranches, the four Swenson Families agreed to partition all of the ranches into four separate family divisions. After the ranches were partitioned, the three other families began selling off their divisions. At the time of this partition, each division of the Swenson Ranches had all or most all of the minerals intact. Each of the four families received one-quarter of the minerals under each of the four divisions. That being the case, the Swenson Family members owning the Flat Top Division have approximately 25% of the minerals under this ranch. Current royalty income is fairly substantial. New drilling is now underway, and recent development would suggest the possibility of a substantial new income source from oil. Since it is very difficult to determine the present value and future potential of the minerals, the family has elected to negotiate on the mineral conveyance based on the final offering price for the property. Based on the family owning approximately 25% of the minerals under the Flat Top Division, current royalty income is approximately $200,000 per year on the original production and approximately $600,000 per year on the newly discovered production. In addition to the income derived from the cattle operation and farming income, other sources of income include hunting lease revenue, periodic surface damage income and income derived from oil and gas leases and oil and gas royalty production. The hunting is leased on a year to year basis and can be extended if a buyer is not interested in hunting, or terminated, if the buyer wants possession of the hunting. The ranch just negotiated a gas pipeline easement crossing approximately 7 miles of the ranch. This pipeline has just been installed and the utility company has re-seeded this easement with grass. The ranch collected $1,300,000 for this easement. While there are no major electric transmission lines currently located on the ranch, many large wind farm developments and transmission lines are located throughout this region of Texas. With this in mind, the owners of the Flat Top Division propose to reserve 25% of any future wind energy royalty income, but the purchaser of the ranch will have full control of negotiating any future wind energy leases. PRICE AND REMARKS The Flat Top Division of the Swenson Ranch is very reasonably priced at $985 per acre. It is very seldom that a ranch of this magnitude and history becomes available in this area of Texas. The owners of the ranch are currently in the process of surveying the entire property in order to establish the exact acres of the ranch. This survey is being paid for by the owners. Property taxes are approximately $63,000 per year or about $1.50 per acre. BROKER COMMENTS The ranch is generally operated with approximately eight full-time employees. In addition to the very knowledgeable ranch manager, there is clerical help at the office in Stamford along with additional farm/ranch employees, including the Taylor Camp manager. All together this efficient staff keeps the books, pays bills, manages the day to day farming and ranching operation, maintains the property and meets with the family on a regular basis. As the broker selected to market this property, it is apparent the current employees are a valuable asset to the ranch and a buyer of this property should strongly consider keeping everyone on board. All employees are anxious to remain with the ranch. This long-term ownership ranch has not been offered for sale throughout the 165-year history of the property. This first time offering of the Swenson Flat Top Ranch is an historic opportunity to own a quality working cattle ranch, which includes an extensive farming operation that can be expanded, if desired. In addition to farming and ranching, the property offers excellent hunting opportunities, potential future wind farm development, periodic surface damage income, and the potential to share in some portion of the mineral income.
$40,385,000

Premier Listing

Double Nickel on the Niobrara
#NE457821
Cherry, 
34,617.00 acres
Located in the Sandhills of Nebraska, the Double Nickel on the Niobrara is one of the finest ranches in the Midwest. An extremely diverse landscape of Sandhills grasslands, pine covered hills and draws, irrigated production farmland and wooded river bottoms provide an amazing combination of beauty, production and recreation seldom seen in a single offering.This unique property is nestled in the beautiful Sandhills region of Northwestern Nebraska, tucked against the Niobrara National Scenic River. This diverse terrain totals approximately 34,617+/- deeded acres with the opportunity for approximately 22,607+/- leased acres. Traveling through the ranch, one will find open plains, rugged terrain and scenic trails through many wooded areas following the 7 miles of river. Excellent wildlife habitat with river bottom and Ponderosa pine covered hills, dramatic caprock views. This income producing ranch offers something for everyone including the cow/calf rancher, seasoned investor, or outdoors enthusiast. Ideal for operating cattle and crop production, this beautiful property could also make an amazing country gentleman’s ranch and getaway. Double Nickel on the Niobrara is that special place, perfect to get away from the hustle and bustle of city life.Cattle Operation:Featuring a capacity for carrying up to 4200 mother cows, the cash flow and the potential of this investment is unparalleled. The current owners operate the ranch with production on the pivots in various types of forage for cattle. Alfalfa, Sudan grass, sorghum and native grass are produced to continue the carrying capacity throughout the year. Across the ranch there are well designed and maintained cattle working facilities that include a 500 head feedlot, large calving shed and livestock barn, and multiple outbuildings.Water:The ranch offers an abundance of quality water. Water is pumped from multiple wells as well as pump stations along the river for livestock and irrigating crops. An extensive system consisting of windmills, solar wells, pipeline, and tanks provide water throughout the ranch. All irrigation pumps and pivots operate with electricity on both ranches. Currently, 13 Center Irrigation Pivots combine for over 2200 acres of irrigated crop land. There are also multiple lakes and ponds located on the ranch, 7 miles of the Niobrara River as well as several miles of Medicine Creek and Steer Creek. (Average rainfall in the area is 19”-22” annually.) Recreation:Double Nickel on the Niobrara is a hunter’s paradise. High quality habitat and readily available water make the ranch a diverse haven to all kinds of wildlife. Starting with the largest inhabitants, the ranch is home to over 200 elk with bulls averaging 310”- 360” Boone and Crockett. Large herds of Mule deer and Whitetail deer can be found both along the river as well as out in the Sandhills offering the opportunity for high quality trophy bucks. Huge flocks of Merriam’s Turkey can be found moving along the fields and tree lined banks of the river. Other wildlife that call the ranch home include Pheasants, prairie chicken, several kinds of ducks as well as Canada geese. Coyotes, bobcat, and the occasional Mountain Lion have all traveled the expanse of the property. There are fishing opportunities in the river and the many ponds on the ranch that include trout and a mix of warm water species. The river provides plenty of opportunity for float trips on tubes, canoe or as the locals like to travel….in a stock tank. Under current operations, the ranch is leased out for hunting. There are cabins on the ranch to accommodate guests, hunters, or fisherman. Other Agri-tourism revenue streams are possible to accompany the hunting operations.The Ranch Details:The ranch consists of 2 units, the East & the West. The West Unit being a mix of sandhills pastures and excellent sub-irrigated and irrigated bottoms. It also has multiple ponds, two lakes and Medicine Creek that flows through its entirety. The West unit also has two residences and multiple outbuildings for the cattle and farming operation.  The East Unit sits along the banks of the Niobrara River and lays adjacent to largest portion of the lease on the Sam McKelvie National Forest. Good feed production with sub-irrigated meadows and pivot irrigated fields. The East Unit has several nice homes, cabins, multiple steel Morton buildings, grain storage.Double Nickel on the Niobrara East:     15,300+/- Deeded Acres     16,500+/- Leased Acres (Samuel R McKelvie Forest Lease)      2,107+/- Leased Acres (State and/or Private Leases)     4 Houses & 4 Cabins     Additional Outbuildings: Shop, Machinery Shed, Calving Sheds, Fire Truck Garage     240,000-Bushel Storage Facility     9 Center Irrigation Pivots with ground & surface water rights (1,484+/- acres)     7 miles of Niobrara River FrontageDouble Nickel on the Niobrara West:     19,317+/- Deeded Acres     4,000+/- Leased Acres (Samuel R McKelvie Forest Lease)     4 Houses     500+/- Head Feedlot     4 Center Irrigation Pivots with ground water rights (764+/- irrigated acres)Location:< 1-hour drive from Valentine, NE3.5-hour drive from Rapid City, SD6-hour drive from Omaha, NE6.5-hour drive from Denver, CO Nearest Airports:Miller Field- Valentine Nebraska (VTN)Runway 3701’x60’ asphaltFuel available- 100LL, Jet AHangers and tiedowns availableDistance to ranch-26 milesAinsworth Regional Airport-Ainsworth, Nebraska (ANW)Runway- 6824’ x 110’ asphaltFuel available- 100LL, Jet A.Distance to ranch-71 milesThomas County Airport- Thedford, Nebraska (TIF)Runway- 4400’ x 60’ asphaltFuel available- 100LL, self-service credit card.Hangers and tiedowns availableDistance to ranch-91 milesNorth Platte Regional Airport- North Platte Nebraska (LBF) Commercial service availableRunway- 8001’x150’ concrete/groovedRunway-4436’x100’ concreteFuel-100LL, Jet AHangers and tiedowns availableDistance to ranch-157 milesOther Area Attractions:Smith Falls State Park, Forth Niobrara and Valentine National Wildlife Refuges as well as Merritt Reservoir State Recreation Area which is some of the best Walleye fishing in northern Nebraska. Fredrick Peak Golf Course is a fantastic 10-hole course designed by the Lehman Design Group know for the Dunes course at the Prairie Club.Livestock and machinery: Not included in listing price. 
$42,500,000