Archive for the ‘Buying Land Ranches Farms’ Category

The Next Generation of 1031 Exchanges

Friday, July 13th, 2018

I am a big fan of old western movies. Regardless of the movie, either a cowboy or the 7th Cavalry always came to the rescue at the last moment to save the day. Predictably, one of my favorite actors is John Wayne. Whether he was chasing the bad guys in the old west, defending the Alamo, winning the Civil War, fighting the Japanese at the Battle of Midway or fighting our enemies at D Day, he always seemed to come to the rescue. That’s what I loved about him and I always wished that in some way, I could do the same.

Well, now I can. I may not be saving Shinbone from Liberty Valance or Europe during WW2 but I can come to the rescue when a property owner is going to sell a property that will create a large tax liability. That works for me. And for you.

When selling a great property, you can either pay taxes on the gains or transact a 1031 exchange to defer taxes. The first isn’t a good option and the second is not always appropriate or has limitations to be completed.

But here is where I come to the rescue. There are numerous ways to defer taxes using the next generation of 1031s. Our Section 453 tax deferral strategies have a 20-year track record of successfully deferring taxes between 2000-2500 times with the largest transaction being $120 million with a tax deferral of $50 million.

If someone wants to transact a 1031 exchange and can complete it that’s great. To be on the safe side, we can guarantee that if a 1031 fails, the sales proceeds will NOT be sent to the seller which now creates a large tax liability but rather that taxes will be deferred, and the client now has unlimited time to find a replacement property.

Consider the following examples.

One of the main limitations in an exchange are the 45 and 180-day time periods. Supply of real estate properties can be elastic.   Sometimes there is a great supply of replacement properties and sometimes there isn’t. What if there were no time constraints to have to deal with.

What if you could sell a property today, defer taxes today and have unlimited time to find a great replacement property. Would that work? Absolutely.

But let’s take that thought to the next level. When transacting a 1031, you buy low and sell high but because of the 45-day period, you may have to buy high when market conditions may be less than favorable to your buyers. What if after you sold high, you had unlimited time to buy again so you could wait until market conditions became more favorable to buyers. Would that work?  Absolutely. And even better, while your buyer is waiting for market conditions to become more favorable, we will pay him a cash flow of 5-6% while he waits. So, using the next generation of 1031 s, you can buy low, sell high and buy better.

Say you have 4 owners of a property and all the owners want you to list their property BUT 2 of the owners want to take their proceeds and run to Vegas…not necessarily a bad strategy and the other 2 want to defer their taxes. Until you get everyone on the same page, you can’t list the property. Get your paperwork ready. The 2 that want to take the money and run can do so and the 2 that want to defer taxes can use our proprietary trust to do so. You get the listing and you owe me lunch. Preferably in Vegas.

Say that there is a property owner that has had a property in the family for 50,60,70 years and longer. He would like to sell but almost the entire sale will be capital gains and depending on where he is domiciled, taxes can range from roughly 25-40% so instead of selling, he decides to keep the property until he passes on and then his kids get the property with the stepped basis.

That’s not a bad strategy for everyone but you because you now can’t sell the property. Instead, what if you could explain to the prospect that you can sell today, defer taxes today, move closer to the grandkids today and receive a higher retirement income than if he sells and pays taxes first. And he can do all of this while alive.

You have a client that has transacted 1031 exchanges for decades and now that he has accumulated wealth, he would like to sell and retire. Unfortunately, he now has to sell and use the basis of the first property to determine taxes and the tax bill will be a whopper.

What if you have a 1031 Exit Strategy. That’s right. By using our trust, he can sell his property and defer taxes for the rest of his life and into the next generation if he chooses to do so.  By deferring taxes, he can enjoy the fruits of his labor by receiving a larger retirement income than if he would have sold and paid taxes first. You are his new best friend.

One last idea. Say that you come across someone that has a high end primary residential property and they want to sell. However, the sale will create a large tax liability to the sellers. You can sell their residence, defer taxes using our trust and help them buy another property any time in the future. That’s a great deal for them and you made a new friend.

These are just a few of our tax deferral strategies so call me so I can come to your rescue. John Wayne would be proud. It shows True Grit. I can’t believe that I typed that. Until the next time, Happy Selling.

 

David Fisher is the managing partner at Creative Real Estate Strategies, a national firm that specializes in deferring taxes in situations where a 1031 isn’t appropriate or can’t be completed. He can be reached at 713-702-6401 or david@cresknowsrealestate.com

Water and the American Landowner

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

Examples of Forward Thinking in Water and Land Conservation

Part 1 of  3

As much of the country is still in the grips of one of the worst droughts on record and water becomes more expensive and scarce, the rural landowner often faces tough decisions on how to best use this valuable resource. In the next three issues of Open Fences Magazine, we will be exploring topics related to water and the American landowner. The following article is the first in this series where we will be discussing and presenting examples of how farm and ranch owners across the country are embracing alternative methods to utilize this resource and still find ways to conserve water, turn a profit, and enhance the quality of their land. In this first article, we will show how one seed rice farm southwest of Houston, Texas has used precision grading to reduce their water usage by up to 40% while still increasing yield and improving the wildlife habitat on the land.

According to the USDA, agriculture is a major user of ground and surface water in the United States that accounts for nearly 80% of the nation’s consumptive water use and over 90% in many of the western states. While there is no question that the food and other products that are sent to market have made this country what it is today, inefficiencies in the system become more apparent when drought affects supply or when other users, such as municipalities, are competing for the resource. The farmers and ranchers who recognize ways to conserve their water use without hurting their operations will be the ones leading us into the future of best management practices for the land.

One of these farmers is Jacko Garrett of Garrett Farms in Danbury, Texas who owns a 3,046-acre farm and ranch where he grows seed rice, live oak trees seedlings, and raises F1 (Brahman x Angus) females and bulls. Approximately 1,500 acres is currently used for the seed rice operation among this lush green, fertile, and well watered landscape.

Mr. Garrett’s parents bought the land back in 1936 for $10 per acre and developed a successful rice farm and Brahman cattle ranch. Today, Garrett Farms is still located on a portion of the original land and Jacko and his wife Nancy have continued the tradition of success. One of the main reasons for this is their dedication, hard work, and willingness to invest in the future.

Jacko realized that even though the rice farm had been successful for all these years, it still required a great deal of water resources and labor to raise this crop. He also understood that water was becoming a precious resource that continued to increase in price and importance to other sectors of society. He felt that it was his responsibility as a farmer and landowner to find ways to minimize these inefficiencies, but still increase his profitability.

While exploring options to improve his bottom line, Jacko learned about the technique called precision grading that could not only help him significantly reduce his water requirements, but also the amount of hired labor to constantly watch and adjust the many levies needed to flood the rice fields.

The technique involves mapping the fields with highly accurate Global Positioning System (GPS) and laser survey equipment, which then displays a contour map on the computer. The engineers can display different options of how the fields should drain and where the levies would now be located prior to moving the first bucket of soil. Jacko was able to consider other land use options, such as where new access roads would be located as well as an airstrip.

The grading had to be done with highly trained equipment operators since the fall of the land had to be contoured to an accuracy of less than 1/8 of an inch. Graders with dump and ejector buckets were used to scrape the ground and move the soil around so the water would drain properly. Jacko estimates that his water usage is now 40% less than what it was prior to the precision grading on his fields and has also increased his yield by approximately 15% as well. With nearly 1,900 acres of his ranch in seed rice and row crop production of which 855 acres has been precision graded, this equates to a great deal of water and cost savings.

As flat as the land seemed prior to the precision grading, there were still small undulations in the ground plane that resulted in variations in depth of the water that had to be controlled by numerous levies. For example, on one 20-acre piece of this land there were approximately 20 levies, now there are only two. It would take a team of three workers approximately a full day to manage the levies on one of the 450-acre parcels of fields. Now it takes one worker about half a day to accomplish the same task.

Another example of Garrett Farms’ commitment to water conservation is their plan to construct a water storage reservoir on one of the lower areas of the farm that is intended to capture the drainage water from the fields and additional runoff from rains. The fields must be drained about two weeks prior to harvesting the rice crop. Currently, the fields are drained and the water returns to the nearby river. Jacko would like to capture this drainage water in the reservoir and recycle it back to the fields with a series of pipes and pumps. After the first cut of rice, the fields can be re-flooded and the second crop will be ready for harvest in approximately another 75 days. Since water prices from the local water authority have more than doubled in the past year, the recycling of this water will be another improvement to reduce his water use and costs.

Although this was not an inexpensive undertaking, these efforts have paid off and according to the IRS, if you are in the business of farming, you can choose to currently deduct your expenses for soil or water conservation or for the prevention of erosion of land used in farming.

Jacko Garrett leads by example with a strong commitment to water conservation and land stewardship on this beautiful land that has been in his family since 1936. This is a wonderful example of how even a farmer/rancher from an older generation is taking on the responsibility to understand this new generation’s water issues and has invested in the technology to conserve water while still operating a successful farm and ranch business.

Jacko also said that one of the added benefits to this type of land and water use is that when the fields are flooded there are more teal and other ducks than you could possibly imagine. Certainly a sight worth seeing.

Garrett Farms has been put on the market and additional information regarding the land and operations can be obtained from agent Minor Taylor with Property Connections in Bay City, TX. Phone 979-245-6055. This farm is offered for $7,966,374.

Tom Roberts is the author and will be working on the second and third articles in the Water and the American Land Owner series for Open Fences Magazine. He is the president of Western Lands – Ranch Restoration Services located in Parker, Colorado. His company designs, develops, and manages land enhancement programs for legacy and investment grade ranch projects throughout the United States. www.western-lands.com. Please contact him at tom@western-lands.com with any questions, comments, or ideas.

Search Ranches for sale to find that perfect ranch for water preservation and habitat improvement.

Hacienda Pinilla Announces Auction to Secure New Owners, Fund Foundation

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

August 21, 2012 (KANSAS CITY, Mo.) – Agroganadera Pinilla, S.A., the owner of Hacienda Pinilla Beach Resort and Residential Community, Guanacaste, Costa Rica, announced today that it will offer qualified investors and developers a unique opportunity to participate in an auction of the Hacienda Pinilla to accelerate the realization of the vision for the project. Additionally, net proceeds from the newly invested capital will be used to permanently fund the operations and charitable work of Guanacaste Ventures U.S., Inc., and its counterpart foundation in Costa Rica, Fundación Progreso Guanacaste, each established by Mr. H.G. (“Pat”) Pattillo, majority shareholder of Agroganadera Pinilla, S.A., to continue the work of the foundations focused on education, healthcare and affordable housing for the people of Guanacaste.

“For over 40 years, I have been blessed and enriched by the opportunity to be part of the Guanacaste community and feel as strongly now as ever about the importance of investing in its future. As I advance in my years, it is important for me to make certain that the work of the foundations continue after I am no longer able to personally ensure that funds are available for continuation of the foundations’ operations. It is our intention to secure a new investor for the project as soon as practical so that we can build on the work of the foundations, which has included the improvement or repair of over 45 schools in Guanacaste, local medical assistance, construction of affordable housing, and scholarships for Guanacaste young people to attend universities in the U.S. It is also important that we continue to build value in the project for the benefit of those that call Hacienda Pinilla home” said Mr. Pattillo, an entrepreneur and philanthropist from Decatur, Georgia.

United Country Real Estate, a premier global real estate brokerage and auction company specializing in marketing distinctive, investment grade real estate assets, has been engaged to assist Agroganadera Pinilla, S.A. to market the project to qualified investors internationally in cooperation with David Pinsel, Managing Director of Colliers International North Texas, and Patrick Duffy, President of Colliers International Houston. The property will be offered to the highest bidder subject to seller confirmation of the offer.

“The newly-renovated international airport – only a 45-minute drive from the project, with increased daily flights and passenger traffic – puts Guanacaste is on the ‘short list’ for global tourists and retirees. Hacienda Pinilla is the premier established resort in the area and combines all the amenities and convenience expected of a world class destination resort community and the best of what the Costa Rican lifestyle has to offer,” said Mr. Dan Duffy, Chief Executive Officer, United Country Real Estate. “There is a reason why the developers of the recently opened J.W. Marriott chose to build on this property. They were secure in the fact that the extensive in-place infrastructure, comprehensive permitting and extensive amenities which include a Mike Young designed 7,300 yard masterpiece 18 hole golf course, beach club and spa, fine dining, equestrian facilities, Certified Audubon International Sanctuary and world class white sand beaches would drive interest in their property…and they were right” added Mr. Duffy.

“Due to the scale of what is being offered to the market, approximately 4,450 acre master-planned and permitted communities and the unique opportunity for investors and developers to invest in a one of a kind project with exceptional infrastructure and “turnkey” operations, Hacienda Pinilla will be offered both in carefully articulated development parcels and in its entirety,” said Mike Jones, President, United Country Auction Services. “We are already receiving exceptionally strong interest in the project. With multiple beach and ocean front, golf course and mountain hotel and residential development tracts, equestrian ‘ranchette’ communities, retail and mixed-use sites there is really something for every developer serious about being part of a truly unique development opportunity in an exceptional part of the world.”

United Country Real Estate is the principal broker and auctioneer representing the seller for this offering in cooperation with Colliers International. Interested parties are welcome to visit www.HaciendaPinillaAuction.com or call 1-800-444-5044 or 1-816-420-6253 to learn more about the investment opportunities at Hacienda Pinilla.

About Guanacaste Ventures U.S., Inc., Fundación Progreso Guanacaste and Hacienda Pinilla

Guanacaste Ventures U.S., Inc., is a private non-profit organization dedicated to improving education, health and housing in the Americas. In cooperation with its sister foundation in Costa Rica, Fundación Progreso Guanacaste, Guanacaste Ventures U.S., Inc., has provided scholarships to Costa Rican students from the region of Guanacaste for use in attending U.S. colleges and universities. The foundations were established in 2005 by Mr. H.G. (“Pat”) Pattillo, the majority shareholder of Agroganadera Pinilla, S.A. The original idea was to use profits garnered from the Hacienda Pinilla Beach Resort and Residential Community to improve the lives and offer educational opportunities of the citizens of the Guanacaste region of Costa Rica. The foundations have used these funds to build and renovate numerous schools and houses, and to fund educational and healthcare initiatives, as well as provide scholarships, every year since its inception.

About United Country

United Country Real Estate is the largest fully integrated network of conventional and auction real estate professionals in the United States and Central America. The company has been an innovator in real estate marketing since 1925. United Country supports nearly 550 offices across the U.S., Costa Rica, Panama and resort areas of Mexico, with a unique, comprehensive marketing program that includes one of the largest portfolios of property marketing websites (more than 3,000 separate sites and traffic of approximately 3 million visitors per month), multiple United Country real estate catalogs with national distribution , an extensive buyer database and national advertising of local properties that reaches more than 90 million homes per week. United Country has recently been recognized by Franchise Business Review, AllBusiness.com, The Land Report, Entrepreneur and The Wall Street Journal as one of the top U.S. real estate companies.

About Colliers International

Colliers International is the third-largest commercial real estate services company in the world, with over 12,300 professionals operating out of more than 522 offices in 62 countries. A subsidiary of FirstService Corporation (NASDAQ: FSRV; TSX: FSV and FSV.PR.U), it focuses on accelerating success for its clients by seamlessly providing a full range of services to real estate users, owners and investors worldwide, including global corporate solutions, brokerage, property and asset management, hotel investment sales and consulting, valuation, consulting and appraisal services, mortgage banking and research. Commercial Property Executive and Multi-Housing News magazines ranked Colliers International the top U.S. real estate company. The latest annual survey by the Lipsey Company ranked Colliers International as the second-most recognized commercial real estate firm in the world.

Foreign Investment in US Ranch and Land Markets

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012

Fay Ranches Client Acquires Three Sites on Historic Jackson Hole Property

Monday, July 16th, 2012

Jackson Hole, WY, July 12, 2012 – Ranch Estate sites 11, 13 &14 at the
Bar BC Ranch in Jackson Hole, Wyoming have been acquired by a
client of Fay Ranches. Brokers Chuck Davison and Mike Jorgenson
represented the buyer—a longtime Fay Ranches client—in these
transactions. The combined asking price for the three ranches was
$23.5 million. With 53 acres, Site 14 is the largest among the
designated parcels that were drawn for solitude, vistas, and minimal
impact on wildlife habitat.

The Bar BC Ranch is a historic 1400-acre property with 17 ranch sites
located near Jackson Hole at the confluence of the Snake and Gros
Ventre Rivers. The original owners created the first guest dude ranch
in 1912 and also became conservation advocates for the Grand
Teton and Yellowstone areas.

“This is among the highest per acre real estate in the West,” observes
Jorgenson, based full time at the Fay Ranches office in Jackson Hole.
(more)“Bar BC is the most dramatic and unique property in the West,” Davison
emphasizes.

Only three ranch parcels remain for sale. Bar BC Ranch is a Hillwood
Communities development owned by Ross Perot, Jr.

Contact:
Juli Miller
208-788-4177 office
916-717-4118 mobile
jmiller@fayranches.com
www.fayranches.com

What Is A Conservation Easement?

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

What Is A Conservation Easement?

Conservation easements convey a lawful interest in land where the landowner gifts or sells rights to a qualified entity like a land trust. The landowner retains full ownership with restrictions on activities they can do on the property. The landowner as well as land trust negotiate the restrictions and constraints that will be placed on the property. Conversation easements are voluntary negative easements, legally binding constraints on the usage of land for conservation, environmental, or historic purposes. They are granted in perpetuity and pertain to the land no matter who may own it in the future.

Landowners can sell or bequeath property that is covered with a conservation easement. Conservation easements can assist landowners in conserving their land, wildlife habitat, scenic areas or historic buildings. They are designed to satisfy the site-specific needs of the individual landowner and land trust. Conservation easements may also provide landowners with gift and property tax benefits.

Conservation easements might involve expenses for items including legal fees, survey and appraisal costs as well as other professional services. They are generally not a one-size-fits-all proposition. Landowners will have to completely understand the conservation easement and the benefits and limitations before signing. Numerous landowners didn’t have a full comprehension of what they were undertaking and therefore are now remorseful of having placed a conservation easement on their property.

Conservation easements are hard to draft and are costly to monitor and enforce over time. The land trust also must continue to keep track of the property to ensure that the landowner is not violating its terms. Landowners are notified when the land trust will be inspecting the property and the land trust has a legal right to enter the property. The land trust must also defend the conservation easement if legal action needs to be taken.

Conservation easements will become a more and more important conservation tool in the 21st century which will have significant benefits including better water and air quality as well preservation of natural resources. Landowners will hopefully educate themselves concerning the advantages and limitations of conservation easements to help make informed decisions. It is critical that landowners possess a full comprehension of what a conservation easement does and does not allowed them to do. Otherwise it is a recipe for conflict concerning the landowner and the land trust. If you’re searching for land for sale and locate a property that you might want that has a conservation easement, be sure to seek a professional who has an understanding of conservation easements so that you have a full comprehension of it before buying the property.

Learn more about Conservation Easements. Stop by Open Fences’ site where you can find out all about land for sale and the best property for you you.

Landowners And Wildlife Management

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Wildlife management involves the employment of scientific knowledge and specialized skills for defense, conservation and management of wildlife in addition to their habitat. It is an interdisciplinary issue which includes biological, technological, social, economical and legal issues. Wildlife management requires expertise in species ecology, biology, behavior, and physiology of wildlife populations. Also, wildlife management studies, research and lobbying by special interest groups assist in selecting times of the year when certain wildlife species can be legally hunted, making it possible for surplus animals to be removed.

Early wildlife management projects focused on protecting against unregulated fishing and hunting for commercial markets. Modern wildlife management shares a few of the same goals and new methods are available for use by managers. It incorporates many of the concepts and uses of modern forest and habitat management with a thorough understanding of wildlife biology, ecology, and behavior. Wildlife Management demands lots of direct, hands-on experience.

A properly prepared wildlife management plan reads just like a recipe that landowners can follow to attain their wildlife management goals. These plans result in the establishment of trophy game populations, and may be used by landowners to obtain wildlife management property tax exemptions or managed lands deer permits in certain states. A carefully designed plan provides for a logical method for using a variety of habitat improvement practices and will often list wildlife management activities with the appropriate seasons and the sequence of events. Landowners should also consider how their wildlife management goals fit with other land use objectives for example farming or timber operations.

Components of a good wildlife management plan include:

1) Land management objectives and goals

2) A resource inventory

3) Site specific habitat improvement recommendations

4) A schedule for executing management practices

5) Documentation and assessment of management efforts as well as their impacts on wildlife habitat.

The rise in private wildlife management, along with the latest trend toward more non game management (often involving more general funding), will have important effects. Intangible benefits from wildlife management may include the joy created from observing wildlife, the pleasure of providing desirable habitat species and the satisfaction from receiving acknowledgement for conservation efforts. For example, an owner may implement a wildlife management plan to enhance wild bird populations and also operate a business in which birdwatchers stay on the land overnight and observe birds during the day (known as a bird-and-breakfast operation).

Landowners are among the best wildlife managers. They have an interest in making certain the wildlife and habitat is managed and maintained at a high level. Visit a local landowner and inquire about their wildlife and habitat management and many times the landowner share with you with great pride what they’ve done to enhance the habitat and wildlife populations.

Want to find out more about Wildlife Management, then visit Open Fences to find the best Wildlife Manager for your hunting property.

The Basics of Easements

Saturday, March 24th, 2012

When buying farms, ranches or land something that you must be aware of and run into frequently is easements. An easement is an irrevocable right to the use of another person’s property. Easements are often misunderstood and this misunderstanding of easements can lead to significant headaches later down the road after closing on a property.

One of the first basic things to determine about the easement in question is, is it appurtenant or in gross. An in gross easement is an easement for the benefit of a person whether they own property or not and does not pass with the land. For example if an in gross easement was granted by a neighbor to fish on their property to Joe and Joe sells his property, Joe’s easement does not pass to the new owner. Joe would still have the easement to fish on the neighbor’s property. However, if an appurtenant easement was granted for Joe to fish on the neighbor’s property then the easement would pass with the land at the time of sale to the new owner. As you can see, it is very important to determine what type of easement it is before you purchase a property.

Something else that you will want to be aware of is there are times where there may not be a written easement but there may be an implied easement or a case for a prescriptive easement. These are easements to research more if you are purchasing property where others are using the property on a regular basis without a written easement. Even though there is not an easement in writing they may be able to establish an easement if they can meet and prove certain criteria. In which case, you would have to continue to grant the easement.

Easements are something that you will run into often when purchasing property. They may be utility easements, rights-of-ways, oil and gas easements, easements for access to property, etc. You will want to understand them and how they will impact your use and enjoyment of a property.

There are many other types of easements and far too many details to discuss in this short article. If you would like to know more about easements, consult your broker or attorney.

Soil Conservation: What it is and Why you as a Land Owner Should Implement It.

Sunday, March 18th, 2012

The Dust Bowl was the catalyst behind a 60-year endeavor in farming: soil conservation. The soil conservation movement was a result of the droughts during the 1930s, the effects of water erosion, the terrific dust storms created by wind erosion in the Great Plains, and by the urging of Hugh Hammond Bennett. In 1935, the Soil Conservation Service , led by Bennett, was established as a permanent agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture . Today there are more than 3,000 soil conservation districts in the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. In 1994, the Soil Conservation Service was renamed Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Your local NRCS District can visit your farm and offer recommendations about which management practices will help improve the quality of your local streams. Landowners apply to local NRCS Districts, which assist in developing farm conservation plans and ensure projects are necessary and feasible.

Soil Conservation helps keep the environment in good working order, which helps provide clean air, food, shelter, clothing and living space which we all need and use. Therefore, soil conservation is as important as any other form of conservation that attempts to safeguard the environment and improve the quality of life of all living beings. Soil conservation aims to prevent the rapid erosion by the two most important agents of erosion, wind and water, especially as their effects are intensified by the disturbance of natural cover or soil position and overuse of soil. Soil conservation is a combination of all methods of management and land use that safeguard the soil against depletion or deterioration by natural or man-induced factors and can help to keep soils fertile and healthy.

Soil conservation practices such as:
1- crop rotation
2- cover crops
3- windbreaks
4- contour plowing
5- conservation plowing

-to name a few were massively developed and set forth upon recovering from the drought experiences of the thirties. It is also the protection of soil against excessive loss of fertility by natural, chemical, or artificial means. A variety of soil conservation practices are used and many of these soil conservation efforts have been practiced for hundreds of years. Others are more recent. In many if not most cases, these efforts have been based upon soil management practices which, while at the time seeming to be beneficial, in the long run were proven to not to be the case, and in some instances led to problems and disasters of epic proportions.

Implementing various soil conservation strategies and methods can help in stemming erosion of the soil, in preserving the quality of the soil and in increasing its productive capacity. Improved crop yield, soil conservation, and plant breeding are some of the impacts seen. There are probably more soil conservation methods in use in the world today than many people realize. Planting Vegetation is one of the most effective and cost saving soil conservation strategies. Crop rotation can also be used assist in soil conservation and is the soil conservation method where a series of different crops are planted one after the other in the same soil area. To improve wildlife habitat, soil conservation practices such as providing buffer strips and windbreaks, or replacing soil organic matter, greatly enhance the quality of the environment for wildlife of all kinds. Another soil conservation technique is the planting of crops specifically grown to provide soil cover. Local landowners take part in soil conservation efforts despite its many challenges.

Data has also allowed evaluation of a number of soil conservation methodologies, which have met with farmer acceptance in some areas by comparing the soil and water loss with that from common farmer practice and from bare soil. Soil conservation is proven to increase the quality and quantity of crop yields over the long term because it keeps topsoil in its place and preserves the long term productivity of the soil. Farmers and landowners should do all they can feasibly do to implement soil conservation practices.

Master Saddler – RICHARD CASTELOW

Thursday, November 24th, 2011

Richard Castelow’s road to becoming a Master Saddler could easily be chronicled on the silver screen. He joined the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment at age fifteen and by the age of twenty, was selected to join the Household Cavalry Saddle shop in Knightsbridge, London.

After rigorous teaching and training under four different master saddlers, undergoing a sum total process similar in scope to gaining a PhD, Castelow was certified a Master Saddler in 1988. Quickly gaining an outstanding reputation, he was appointed as the first ever Master Saddler to Queen Elizabeth II, based at the Royal Mews, Buckingham Palace.

After four years with the Royal Household, Castelow moved to the
United States to use his knowledge and expertise for the benefit of American riders: “What I’ve done is I’ve taken the unique parts of French and German saddles to create an American saddle that is unique to the American market,” comments Castelow. (http://www.chronofhorse.com/article/richard-castelow-creates-saddles-fit-queen).

Where many saddle trees are made of plastic, a material that has very little flexibility, Castelow’s saddles contain five layers of laminated Beachwood to absorb movement. “When I design my saddles, I keep in mind that there are three moving objects, and my job is to eliminate as much movement as I can with the saddle to make the horse, rider and saddle move in harmony,” states Castelow. His dedication to mastering his craft helped him turn a natural talent into a phenomenon and those who ride a Castelow saddle never go back.

www.richardcastelow.com

To find ranches for sale where you can ride and try out a new Castelow saddle visit www.landbrokermls.com