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Name :Michael Tragner
Company :Fountains Land
Address :76 River St Suite 301
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City :Monpelier
State :Vermont
Zipcode :05602
Phone :802-233-9040
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Eagle Ledge Timberland Tract
#VT257692
Washington, Vermont
3568.00 acres
Introduction Eagle Ledge Timberland Tract is a long-term timber investment opportunity characterized by an attractive species composition, highly-stocked stands providing positive cash flow, and excellent potential for asset appreciation from the timber resource. The ownership, Vermont Land Trust (VLT), acquired the land in 2014 from the Meyer Family, who formerly owned the property since the 1950s. The family sold to VLT with the goal of insuring the property will remain as a long-term forest resource. VLT is currently transferring a conservation easement on the land to the State of Vermont, who will oversee the easement terms. Investment highlights include: Species dominated by maple and birch (59%); Fully-stocked overstory, well-positioned for asset appreciation; Mature timber component, allowing for positive cash flow; Developed access covering much of the landscape (limited access to some areas in SE and NE sections of the land); Easement allows for sustainable forest management, sugarbush operations and three primitive camps. Location The property is located in north-central Vermont, 12 miles north of the state’s capital city of Montpelier. Both Worcester and Elmore have small village centers with job markets nearby in the larger towns of Morrisville, Stowe, Montpelier and Waterbury. Route 12 runs north-south, creating the land’s western boundary in many areas and providing access to Interstate 89 and Route 2 to the south and Routes 15 and 100 to the north. These major roads provide transportation corridors to regional and Canadian forest product mills from the property. Access The property offers developed access at five landing points along Route 12, covering nearly all of the terrain sloping toward the river that runs along this paved road. In addition, an undeveloped right-of-way leading from Route 12 provides possible access to the extreme southern end of the land. Much of the terrain that slopes in an easterly direction, as well as extreme eastern areas, are accessed from the unmaintained Eagle Ledge town road where various established landings exist. The north-central section of the land is accessed from the unmaintained portion of Hardwood Flats Road. Site Description The property spans nearly 4 miles from north to south and 2.2 miles east to west (at its widest points). All aspects are represented. Elevation ranges from 1,670’ in the eastern section to ±900’ along Route 12. The majority of the terrain sits at elevations between 1,100-1,500’. Most of the property can be characterized as moderate to steeply sloping upland terrain, providing well-drained soils in these areas. Poorly-drained soils and wetlands exist in pockets scattered around the property, often associated with streams in low-lying, flat areas. The non-commercial acreage is limited to wetlands, roads and landings, thus all upland terrain has been accessed in the past during commercial thinning operation. Timber Timber data is based on a monumented and comprehensive timber inventory conducted in August 2018. The timber data reveal a total sawlog volume of 27,747 MBF International ¼” scale (8 MBF/commercial acre) with 76,708 pulpwood cords (22 cords/commercial acre). Combined total commercial per acre volume is 38 cords, well above the regional average. Stumpage values were assigned to the volumes in August of 2018, producing a property-wide Capital Timber Value (CTV) of $4,808,700 ($1,380/total commercial acre). A species composition dominated by hardwoods prevails, with hardwoods at 76% and softwoods at 24% of total volume. Species composition for all products combined offers a favorable mix and is led by red maple (23%), followed by yellow birch (18%), sugar maple (18%), hemlock (17%), American beech (10%) and spruce/fir (7%), with other common hardwoods and softwoods comprising the balance. This species composition is well suited to a long-term timber investment, with solid markets regionally and into Quebec for the products growing on the land. The current owner has not conducted any thinning activity since their 2014 acquisition of the property. The former family owner last managed some stands from the last landing on Eagle Ledge Road roughly 20 years ago. However it has been nearly 30 years since the balance of the forest stands have been managed. Average diameter for all products combined is 13.5”, while the average sawlog diameter is nearly 14.5”, indicating a forest resource with a mature and maturing age class. Average diameter for the four main species are: sugar maple 14”, yellow birch 14.5”, hemlock 16” and red maple 15”. Easement The conservation easement on the property will be held by the State of Vermont, Agency of Natural Resources, Department of Forest, Parks and Recreation. The seller, Vermont Land Trust (VLT) has been the owner since 2014, acquiring the land from the Meyer Family whose wish was to ensure the property would remain as a productive, unfragmented forest resource landscape. The VLT is currently transferring the conservation easement to the State of Vermont, a process that is anticipated to occur in 2019. VLT is hoping to agree on purchase terms subject to the transfer of the conservation easement, at which point title will be transferred to the new owner. A working forest “partnership” with the State of Vermont, Agency of Natural Resources offers the new owner predictability and cooperation, given the long history and solid reputation this agency has in overseeing other conservation easements under their stewardship
$3,270,000
Herring Brook Forest
#VT257691
Washington, Vermont
2228.00 acres
Introduction This timberland investment has been carefully managed for 30 years, with third-party FSC certification covering the last 10 years, yielding one of the finest timber resource tracts in the region. The asset appreciation management regime has focused growth on chosen species, favoring the highest stem quality, and producing a crop that is at or nearing maturity. Property highlights: · Standing timber value of $2,567,000; · Excellent access and operability with good regional forest product markets; · A resource prime for robust asset appreciation with cash flow options. Location Situated in the north-central part of the state, the forest occupies much of the central portion of Moretown township, a rural, largely forested landscape. Adjacent to the capital city of Montpelier, Moretown is primarily a bedroom community for Montpelier, Barre, Waterbury and larger employers in the Burlington region. This region is known for nurturing productive stands of sugar maple and other commonly occurring northern hardwoods. The area also benefits from a diverse array of regional and local markets for forest products, including sawlogs, veneer, pulpwood and maple sap/syrup outlets. Downtown Montpelier, located 6 miles to the east, is the hub of the region and offers numerous shops and restaurants, a lively cultural scene, several colleges, state government and an array of employers. Outdoor recreation is a popular pastime with numerous hiking and biking trails throughout the region, and 4 alpine ski areas within an hour’s drive. Burlington, the state’s largest city, is a 50-minute drive to the northwest. Boston is 3 hours southeast of the property. Access The property is accessed by Herring Brook Road, a gravel road that creates 2.7 miles of property frontage. The land’s frontage is on an unmaintained portion of the road, 0.4 miles from the town-maintained section of the road, where electric power is available. Herring Brook Road offers excellent access for future forest management operations, supporting all forms of log truck traffic. The northernmost property area offers a 0.7-mile seasonal internal road (culverts pulled) into the center of this operating unit. Boundary lines are in very good condition, with all lines maintained and visible with red paint. There is a survey of the property. Site Description The property is entirely forested with all aspects represented. The forest is named after Herring Brook, a mountain brook whose watershed originates from the land’s central and northern terrain. The property also covers terrain within four other local watersheds. Topography is quite variable, however the majority of slopes are gentle to moderate. Areas of steep slopes can be found on terrain leading to hill tops and along streams. Many of the areas adjacent to Herring Brook and Lynch Hill Roads are level, former cropland that was planted to softwood species in the 1950s. In and around these areas, old foundations and stone walls indicate historic settlement in the area dating back to the early 1800s. Much of the land’s northwest boundary runs along the Northfield Mountain Range, where elevation ranges from 1,600’ to 1,876’. At the opposite end of the forest, Chase Mountain is another notable land feature where the property rises just south of its peak to an elevation of 2,000’. The lowest elevation is 1,000’ where Herring Brook flows off the forest. Generally, well-drained, upland soils predominate. Timber 2016 timber data reveal a total sawlog volume of 12,344 MBF International ¼” scale (5.7 MBF/acre), with 27,809 pulpwood cords (12.8 cords/acre). Combined total commercial per acre volume is 24.2 cords, an average stocking figure for the region. Growth was assigned by the ownership, with stumpage values set by the ownership’s forest manager in January 2019, producing a property-wide Capital Timber Value (CTV) of $2,567,500 ($1,152/total acre). The species composition is dominated by hardwoods (73%), with softwoods holding the balance (27%). Species composition for all products combined mirrors that of a managed northern hardwood forest type, with the exception of the planted pine stands. Overall volume is led by sugar maple (35%), with the major associated species consisting of red maple (13%), white pine (13%) and yellow birch (8%). Other common associates complete the profile. The sawlog volume breakdown is similar; however, pine and spruce hold a higher sawlog component. Past forest management has had a noticeable impact on reducing the American beech component, which was considerably higher when management began 30 years ago. Since the tenure of the current owner began in 2008, forest management activity in the form of thinnings, shelterwoods and group selection treatments has been completed on roughly 85% of the acreage. A relatively small portion of the acreage was treated by an overstory removal, limited to part of the mature softwood plantations. This forest management activity focused growth on the best stems, primarily favoring healthy trees of selected desirable species with large diameters. Pine plantations occupy roughly 160 acres with standing volumes well over 10,000 MBF/acre. Fully-stocked, high-quality northern hardwoods stands, where sugar maple is the primary species, cover roughly 1,090 acres. The previously-treated hardwood stands are currently in a free-to-grow state with no thinning activity required over the next 10 years. The softwood plantations can be harvested at any time.
$2,890,481
Deep Gibou
#VT257690
Franklin, Vermont
2779.00 acres
Introduction Deep Gibou Forest is a long-term timber and/or immediate sugarbush opportunity with attractive species composition, productive soils, secure access and excellent potential for asset appreciation from the timber resource. Investment highlights include: Species dominated by sugar maple (43%); Middle-aged, fully-stocked overstory, well-positioned for asset appreciation with Capital Timber Value of $2,311,000; Excellent access with power nearby; Sugarbush opportunity with ±113,000 potential taps from stems 9” and greater on north-facing slopes with good sap-flow conditions to access locations; Average tap/acre of 48, with many areas offering the possibility of 70-80 taps/acre. Location The majority of the forest lies in the northern Vermont town of Montgomery. Regionally, the land’s western boundary occupies the northern end and ridgeline of the Cold Hollow Mountains, a range that geologically is the boundary between the agricultural lands in the Champlain Valley to the west and vast forestland to the east, including the Green Mountain Range. The small town of Montgomery Center is located 4 miles to the northeast. The Jay Peak Ski resort is 8 miles further to the east along Route 242. Richford and the Canadian border are 17 miles to the north. Montreal, Canada is a 1.5-hour drive, while Burlington, Vermont is a 1.25-hour drive. Nearby state roads offer ideal access to regional and cross-border forest product manufacturing facilities. Access The property offers excellent access to each of the land’s two main watersheds. The eastern half of the land has frontage along Deep Gibou Road, a town-maintained road. From this access point, a 1.3-mile internal road runs to the center of this eastern management unit. Part of the initial section of this road runs across an adjacent landowner's property, for which a full right-of-way exists. Access to the western half of the property is provided by a non-maintained Class IV graveled road. This road ends ±3,000’ into the property from the boundary line, at the base of the Cold Hollow Mountains. Well-developed woods trails run throughout the property, facilitating future management of the forest. Site Description The property’s terrain is variable, with moderate slopes occupying its central and northeastern areas. The western and extreme eastern areas are defined by steep slopes, which are still largely operable, with the exception of 407 acres along the western boundary. This area has been defined as an Ecological Protection Zone and is off limits to any forest management (no timber data was recorded in this area). Generally, conditions for forest operations are very good within the acreage delineated for forest management. Soils are mostly well drained, with the exception of various wetlands near each of the internal access roads and a high elevation wetland at the land’s southern end. Wetland Protection Zones such as this make up 84 total acres. Elevation ranges from 2,940’ ASL (Above Sea Level) along the Cold Hollow Range to 1,280’ ASL in the northeast section of the land near Deep Gibou Road. Timber Timber data in this report are based on a monumented and comprehensive timber inventory conducted in May 2016 by the ownership’s forest consultant. 427 inventory plots were sampled (1 plot per 5.6 commercial acres), covering a 420’ x 420’ grid and using a 15-factor prism. Sampling statistics are ±6.0% standard error for sawlog products and ±3.5% for all cordwood products at the 95% confidence interval, figures well within industry standards. After applying growth for 2017 and 2018 using regional FIA data averages, the timber data reveal a total sawlog volume of 9,667 MBF International ¼” scale (4.2 MBF/commercial acre) with 40,970 pulpwood cords (17.7 cords/commercial acre). Combined total commercial per acre volume is 26.1 cords, above the regional average. Stumpage values were assigned to the volumes in December of 2018, producing a property-wide Capital Timber Value (CTV) of $2,311,000 ($832/total acre). A species composition dominated by hardwoods prevails, with hardwoods at 95% and softwoods at 5% of total volume. Species composition for all products combined offers a favorable mix and is led by sugar maple (43%), followed by yellow birch (21%), American beech (17%) and red maple (6%), with other common hardwoods and softwoods comprising the balance. The sawlog volume breakdown consists largely of sugar maple (52%) and yellow birch (24%). This species composition is well suited to a long-term timber investment and/or sugarbush, with solid markets regionally and into Quebec for the products growing on the land. Average diameter for the three main species are sugar maple 14.5”, yellow birch 15.0” and spruce/fir 12.5”. Special Features The property offers an exceptional potential sugarbush opportunity, given the high maple stocking, and terrain which slopes downhill to two access points. The timber data indicate a total gross potential tap count of 112,655 taps, with roughly 87% of the taps from sugar maple and the balance from red maple. Trees 9” and greater were considered, providing an average of 49 taps/acre, covering the property’s commercial acres. Electric power runs along Deep Gibou Road roughly 1,000’ from the eastern watershed and ±4,000’ from the western watershed. Easement The conservation easement on the property will be held by the Vermont Land Trust (VLT), a Vermont-based organization and one of the most respected conservation organizations in the nation. A working forest “partnership” with VLT offers the new owner predictability and cooperation, given the long history and solid reputation this land trust has established regarding the easement lands under its jurisdiction. A principal objective of the easement’s commercial acreage is to maintain, grow and harvest forest resources and products on a sustainable basis. The terms of the easement prevent subdivision and future development of any kind; however, forestry and sugarbush operations, and construction of associated support infrastructure, are permitted. Easement highlights include: Most sustainable and traditional forestry and sugarbush activities are permitted to support the long-term stewardship of the protected property; The entire property is open to non-vehicular public recreation and hunting; Silvicultural activities are limited to sustainable levels, with target diameters set for each species; Surface Water Protection Zones (SWPZs - 84 acres) permit limited harvesting/sugaring with special consideration to maintaining water quality; Ecological Protection Zones (EPZs - 407 acres) are “No Touch” and situated mostly at the higher elevation and steep terrain along the Cold Hollow Range; One camp structure of 800 ft2 is permitted.
$2,440,000
Catamount Timberland Tract
#VT257689
Washington, Vermont
5918.00 acres
Introduction Catamount Timberland Tract is a long-term timber investment opportunity characterized by an attractive species composition, highly-stocked stands providing positive cash flow, and excellent potential for asset appreciation from the timber resource. The ownership, Vermont Land Trust (VLT), acquired the land in 2014 from the Meyer Family, who formerly owned the property since the 1950s. The family sold to VLT with the goal of ensuring the property will remain as a long-term forest resource. VLT is currently transferring a conservation easement on the land to the State of Vermont, who will oversee the easement terms. Investment highlights include: Species dominated by maple and birch (58%); Timber value of $2,765,000; Fully-stocked overstory, well-positioned for asset appreciation; Mature timber component, allowing for positive cash flow; Developed access, covering nearly all of the landscape; Easement allows for sustainable forest management, sugarbush operations and three primitive camps. Location The property is located in north-central Vermont, 12 miles north of the state’s capital city of Montpelier. Both Worcester and Elmore have small village centers with job markets nearby in the larger towns of Morrisville, Stowe, Montpelier and Waterbury. Route 12 runs north-south, creating much of the land’s eastern boundary and providing access to Interstate 89 and Route 2 to the south and Routes 15 and 100 to the north. These major roads provide transportation corridors to regional and Canadian forest product mills from the property. The region’s landscape is defined by the high-elevation Worcester Range, a 15-mile long, north-south mountain range with the property’s Catamount Brook watershed comprising much of the land’s terrain. Access The property offers two developed landing access points and a right-of-way along Route 12, covering nearly all of the central and northern terrain, sloping towards the North Branch of the Winooski River, which runs along this paved road. Much of the upper slopes and southern area of the Catamount Basin is accessed by Hampshire Hill Road, a town-maintained road that ends at the property. This road continues well into the property as a private road for nearly 4,000’. From this point, an old winter road provides access to the upper slopes. However this road will require ±$32k of road improvements before it can be used for trucks. Site Description The property spans nearly 3 miles from north to south and 2 miles east to west (at its widest point). Primarily eastern aspects are represented. Elevation ranges from 2,620’ in the western section (only 6.25 acres are above 2,500’) to ±900’ along Route 12. The majority of the terrain sits at elevations between 1,100-1,600’. Most of the property can be characterized as moderate to steeply-sloping upland terrain, providing well-drained soils in these areas. Poorly-drained soils and wetlands exist in pockets scattered around the property, often associated with streams in low-lying, flat areas. The non-commercial acreage is limited to wetlands, roads and landings, thus all upland terrain has been accessed in the past during commercial thinning operations. The North Branch of the Winooski River runs along the property in a spot adjacent to Route 12. A notable waterfall along the river is situated a stone’s throw from the property’s boundary in this area. Catamount Brook drains much of the property before entering the Winooski River along its property frontage on Route 12. Timber Timber data is based on a monumented and comprehensive timber inventory conducted in August 2018. The timber data reveal a total sawlog volume of 15,683 MBF International ¼” scale (6.8 MBF/commercial acre) with 44,837 pulpwood cords (19.5 cords/commercial acre). Combined total commercial per acre volume is 33 cords, well above the regional average. Stumpage values were assigned to the volumes in August of 2018, producing a property-wide Capital Timber Value (CTV) of $2,765,400 ($1,200/total commercial acre). A species composition dominated by hardwoods prevails, with hardwoods at 79% and softwoods at 21% of total volume. Species composition for all products combined offers a favorable mix and is led by red maple (23%), followed by yellow birch (22%), American beech (14%) sugar maple (14%), hemlock (11%) and spruce/fir (10%), with other common hardwoods and softwoods comprising the balance. This species composition is well suited to a long-term timber investment, with solid markets regionally and into Quebec for the products growing on the land. The current owner has not conducted any thinning activity since their 2014 acquisition of the property. The former family owner last managed stands on the eastern side of the property along the winter road roughly 20 years ago. For the balance of the property, it has been ±30 years since stands have been managed. Average diameter for all products combined is 13.5”, while the average sawlog diameter is nearly 14.5”, indicating a forest resource with a mature and maturing age class. Average diameter for the three main species are red maple 16”, yellow birch 15” and spruce/fir 13”. Easement The conservation easement on the property will be held by the State of Vermont, Agency of Natural Resources, Department of Forest, Parks and Recreation. The seller, Vermont Land Trust (VLT), has been the owner since 2014, acquiring the land from the Meyer Family whose wish was to ensure the property would remain as a productive, unfragmented forest resource landscape. VLT is currently transferring the conservation easement to the State of Vermont, a process that is anticipated to occur in 2019. VLT is hoping to agree on purchase terms subject to the transfer of the conservation easement, at which point title will be transferred to the new owner. A working forest “partnership” with the State of Vermont, Agency of Natural Resources offers the new owner predictability and cooperation, given the long history and solid reputation this agency has in overseeing other conservation easements under their stewardship
$1,910,000
Pulaski County Tract
#GA300374
Pulaski, Georgia
769.00 acres
The Pulaski County Tract was once owned by a lumber company family from Savannah and before them it was owned by a local family that still has a small abandoned cemetery on the property. There is a barb wire fence around the cemetery and is shown on the map. The property has been used for timber production for at least the last 30 years. The current owners developed the tract for the multiple uses focusing on timber growth, recreation, agriculture leasing, and hunting. The property outside the fenced area is a beautiful old growth hardwood bottom on Big Creek which flows into the Ocmulgee River. Wildlife is abundant throughout the tract with excellent deer and turkey, and an occasional bear spotted in the area. There is a pond on the north end with bass and bream as well as and some good duck hunting opportunities.
$1,900,000
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